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    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
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Oh Christmas Tree, Oh Christmas Tree! How important is IPM for your branches!

You don’t have to travel very far—indeed you just need to go as far as your neighborhood “big box” or grocery story—to find a healthy offering of Christmas trees. In the Southern US, Fraser firs are among the favorite. In fact, Frasers are one of the favorites of White House residents, as it has graced the Blue Room more than any other tree since the 1960s. The Internet is lush with information about how to size a tree for the space it will occupy and how to care for the tree once you’ve gotten it home. I’m going to focus on a topic that few people want to think out—pests and diseases that can affect Christmas trees.

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Two-spotted spider mite genome decoded

A University of Utah biologist and an international research team decoded the genetic blueprint of the two-spotted spider mite, raising hope for new ways to attack the major pest, which resists pesticides and destroys crops and ornamental plants worldwide.

Read the rest of the story at Science Daily.

New Boxwood Disease Found in Southeast

Boxwood blight (also called “box blight” in Europe), caused by the fungal pathogen Cylindrocladium buxicola, was reported for the first time in the U.S. at two North Carolina production nurseries in October, 2011. Boxwoods originating from an infected block of plants at one of the North Carolina nurseries were planted in two production fields in Virginia. The Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services and the North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services are developing and implementing mitigation strategies aimed at aggressively removing the pathogen from infested fields and stopping the spread of this disease.

Read more about it.