North Carolina’s first case of EEE this year confirmed in Brunswick County

See the original story at channel 6 WECT

North Carolina’s first case of Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE) for 2013 has been reported in connection to the death of a Brunswick County horse at the beginning of July, according to a spokesperson for Brunswick County Health Services.

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Disease resistance breakthrough could improve soybean profits

In Southeast Farm Press

By Steve Leer

, Purdue University

Purdue University researchers have identified two genes within the soybean genome that are highly resistant to a soilborne pathogen that causes Phytophthora root and stem rot, a disease that costs U.S. soybean growers more than $250 million annually in lost yield.

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Proposed online urban IPM curriculum offers training that caters to the user’s needs

School IPM coordinators will soon have a cheaper, easier way to get IPM training, thanks to a newly funded regional IPM project.

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EPA Awards $215,295 Environmental Education Grant to the University of Arkansas to educate on pesticide and chemical use reduction

On July 19, 2013, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is awarding a $215,295 Environmental Education Grant to the University of Arkansas for Medical Services. The grant will provide education to teachers, middle school students and parents on Pesticide Management Practices and Chemical Use Reduction in Homes to promote healthier homes.

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Be on the lookout for ticks and tick-borne diseases

Summer is the season for outdoor activities like picnics and nature hikes, bringing people more risk of being bitten by a tick. With all of the emphasis on Lyme Disease, it can be easy to concentrate your worry on the possibility of Lyme Disease. Unfortunately, there are several diseases carried by ticks, and these diseases are specific to certain species. So in addition to identifying the biting insect as a tick, you must also be prepared to identify the species of tick.

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Are Mosquito Misting Systems A Good Idea?

In Raleigh, I’ve noticed this summer that several residences have signs in their yards from mosquito control companies. I live in a wooded area myself, and because we’ve had so much rain this year, I have noticed that we already have quite a few mosquitoes, and we’re just in the middle of July.

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Cover Crops Boosted Corn And Soybean Yields In 2012 Drought, Survey Shows

During last year’s historic drought, farmers who took advantage of cover crops, a soil-enhancing conservation practice, managed to improve their yields by as much as 14% compared to those who did not, a new survey shows.

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Following the Footprint of Invasive Trees

In Agricultural Research Service News

By Ann Perry
July 8, 2013

Scientists at the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) have been investigating ways of using aerial photography and computer programs to quickly identify and measure areas affected by invasive trees. As a result, Agricultural Research Service (ARS) rangeland scientists Kirk Davies and Matt Madsen have developed tools that could help land managers protect sagebrush ecosystems and control invasive vegetation more economically and efficiently.

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In Alabama, weeds outweigh insect problems

In Southeast Farm Press

From an insect pest standpoint, these could be viewed as the best of times for Alabama cotton producers, says Ron Smith, Auburn University Extension entomologist.

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Impatiens downy mildew widespread in Kentucky

A new disease affecting a popular bedding and container plant will likely change the look of Kentucky gardens for years to come, said Nicole Ward Gauthier, extension plant pathologist for the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment.

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