We’ve made progress in fighting invasives but still have a way to go

In the US alone, introduced species cause an economic impact of $157 billion, according to an article published in a 2005 issue of Frontiers in Ecological Environment. At that time, most of the attention for exotic invaders was being given to those that negatively affected crops. However, in the last 10 years, research and extension activities have expanded to include areas of public recreation and environmental concern (such as the hemlock woolly adelgid). Three authors from Tennessee and California explore “Introduced species policy, management, and future research needs” by looking at the status of introduced species management in 2005 and recommending ways that research could help. This post will add thoughts on ways that invasive species management has changed since then and how research has helped to inform the public about the importance of managing invasive species and how people can help.

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Predators delay pest resistance to Bt crops

Crops genetically modified with the bacterium Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis) produce proteins that kill pest insects. Steady exposure has prompted concern that pests will develop resistance to these proteins, making Bt plants ineffective.

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