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  • Funded by USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture

    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
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Check out US EPA’s newly renovated Healthy Schools Website!

To better serve our schools community, the US EPA has made a few changes to its www.epa.gov/schools website.  The schools website is an excellent resource to find all you need to know about beginning, maintaining or enhancing healthy school environments for children. We’ve added new information and reformatted the site to provide for a more user friendly experience.  You will find the latest school environmental health news on our “School Bulletin” board, as well as resources and tools to create or enhance healthy, safe learning environments for children.

Forming a battlefront against pests in schools: the pest management team

Think of a school IPM program as a battle with a powerful army. The more people you have on your side, the more likely you are to have victory. Insects and small rodents may be smaller than us, but they adapt quickly and enter and exit through places that are normally ignored by people, such as tiny cracks under a door or a small hole in a dark corner. To outsmart insect and mammalian pests, people have to do two things: think like a pest and work as a team.

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Fungicides, rotation and diversity keep peanut disease in check

From Delta Farm Press

Rainfall is a blessing most of the time for dryland peanut farmers along the Mississippi Gulf Coast, but it can also be a curse for fighting peanut diseases. For peanut producer Steve Seward, crop rotation, diversity and a strong fungicide program help keep disease in check and yields consistently high.

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