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  • Funded by USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture

    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
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EPA Introduces New Graphic to Help Consumers Make Informed Choices about Insect Repellents

The EPA today unveiled a new graphic that will be available to appear on insect repellent product labels. The graphic will show consumers how many hours a product will repel mosquitoes and ticks when used as directed.

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IPM Institute Co-Director Position Available

The IPM Institute is seeking a highly motivated and self directed person with management experience to contribute leadership and oversight to the IPM Institute as a co-director. The co-director will be responsible for leading development of community IPM initiatives, engaging with clients and funders, HR development, strategic planning and working with the board of directors. Applicants must have experience and knowledge of current trends in IPM and sustainability and excellent communication, interpersonal, networking, advocacy and decision-making skills. Salary range for the co-director position is $45,000 – $60,000 commensurate with experience and includes a comprehensive benefits package. More.

Planting date impacts peanut disease pressure

In Southeast Farm Press

A cooler, rain-soaked spring in parts of the Southeast pushed peanut planting dates later than usual, a factor that can impact the type and incidence of disease growers experience throughout the remainder of the season.

“Planting dates definitely make a difference in peanut diseases, both in the type of disease you have and the pressure,” says Austin Hagan, Auburn University Extension plant pathologist.

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