Hamer Research Team Collaborates to Protect Endangered Whooping Crane Populations from Vector-Borne Parasites

by Rob Williams

A collaboration among Dr. Gabriel Hamer’s Research Team in the Department of Entomology, the College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Science, and the International Crane Foundation is helping to save the whooping crane populations by studying vector-borne parasites in both whooping and sandhill cranes in the United States and Canada.

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Online School IPM Curriculum Available—with educational credits

IPM professionals who need to boost their continuing education credits or work toward license renewal now have a way to get them without traveling long distances to attend an expensive workshop. Thanks to a new web-based school IPM course curriculum developed by Texas A&M AgriLife specialists, school IPM coordinators, animal control and code enforcement officers, and pest management professionals can get training and continuing education credits without ever leaving their desks.

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Field Diagnosis of Key Diseases & Insect Pests in Vegetables

This course will take place at the Madren Conference Center and Clemson University Organic Farm Clemson, SC, September 11, 2014, 9am – 4:30pm.

This one-day course will focus on field diagnosis of key diseases and insect pests affecting vegetable crops in South Carolina and the region. Participants will learn about techniques for sampling and identification of key diseases and their symptoms, and for insect pests and their natural enemies. Participants will gain experience with field monitoring of disease and insect pests on vegetables at the Clemson Organic Farm, and with instruction will practice disease and insect identification using stereo microscopes and hand lenses. All participants will receive a hand lens to take home. Lunch will be provided, and there will be ample time for questions and discussion about disease and insect problems and solutions. Continue reading

Mid-south still battling sugarcane aphid

From Delta Farm Press

As harvest nears, the white sugarcane aphid continues its residency in much of the Mid-South’s grain sorghum.

“This pest jumps out pretty quickly,” said Nick Seiter, University of Arkansas entomologist. “It can hit high numbers very quickly. There have been a lot of acres sprayed for it. At least half the crop has been sprayed or should have been. It’s become a major concern for milo throughout the state.”

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