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  • Funded by USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture

    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
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Rats! New York City Tries To Drain Rodent ‘Reservoirs’

From New Hampshire Public Radio

by Joel Rose

New York City is launching the latest salvo in its never-ending war on rats.

City officials are ramping up efforts to teach regular New Yorkers how to make their streets, businesses and gardens less hospitable to rodents — in other words, to see their neighborhood the way a health inspector would.

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Flathead borers attacking blueberry bushes in Georgia

In Southeast Farm Press

By Ash Sial, University of Georgia

Over the past few weeks, we have received several reports of flatheaded borer infestation in blueberry orchards. The flatheaded borers are a complex of over 600 species of beetles in the United States. The adult flatheaded borers are metallic wood-boring beetles, which are perhaps the most serious pests attacking a wide range of bush and tree species.

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Looper numbers picking up in North Carolina soybeans

In Southeast Farm Press

By Dominic Reisig, NC State University Extension Entomologist

Looper numbers have really picked up in soybeans.  Loopers are migratory pests that sometimes show up late season and eat leaves, but not pods or seeds.

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Sorghum farmers concerned about anthracnose

From Southeast Farm Press

The disease of real concern to North Carolina sorghum growers is anthracnose, which has appeared every year in the state since North Carolina State University started working with the crop, according to Dr. Randy Weisz, North Carolina Extension small grains specialist.

Anthracnose is a fungal disease that is common in sorghum in this wet and humid region, Weisz said. Weisz notes that preliminary research shows that yield loss in sorghum due to anthracnose can be as high as 15 to 30 bushels per acre. NC State is conducting fungicide studies to control the disease.

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