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Do you have circular dead patches in your lawn?

In the University of Georgia Landscape Alert blog

This blog is adapted from the original by Alfredo Martinez, UGA Plant Pathologist and Willie Chance, UGA Center for Urban Agriculture

This year did your lawns show round or irregular dead or dying patches? Did the grass yellow or wilt even though the soil is moist? If so, these lawns may be infected with Take All root rot. This fungal disease affects cen­tipede, St. Augustine and Bermuda lawns.

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Tennessee plant pathologist not sounding alarms on target spot yet

Original article and video in Southeast Farm Press

BLOGGER’S NOTE: The Southern IPM Center funded some of Dr. Hagan’s research on target spot, which has helped inform Dr. Kelly’s observations about the disease.

Begin article:

Heather Kelly says she doesn’t want to sound too many alarms about target spot in cotton just yet.

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Plenary Speakers Announced for 2015 IPM Symposium

The symposium planning committee is pleased to announce the line-up of plenary speakers for the 8th International IPM Symposium – http://ipmcenters.org/ipmsymposium15 – to be held March 23-26, 2015 in Salt Lake City, Utah USA:

-Jim Jones, Assistant Administrator, Office of Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention (OCSPP), U.S Environmental Protection Agency Continue reading

Fungi may one day control tumbleweed

In USDA ARS News

By Jan Suszkiw

Beneficial fungi could become microbial marshals tasked with wrangling a weedy icon of the American West, Salsola tragus—also known as tumbleweed or Russian thistle.

Popularly depicted in movies and television tumbling through dusty towns of the Old West, tumbleweed is in fact one nasty hombre of the western American landscape, elbowing aside crops, clogging irrigation ditches, spreading insect pests, and even posing a driving hazard.

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