Scientists find possible biological control for redbay ambrosia beetle

Scientists at the University of Florida have discovered a few fungal biological control options that show promise for fighting the redbay ambrosia beetle. They discuss the results of their experiments in a refereed article in Biological Control.

The redbay ambrosia beetle (RAB) was first discovered in southeast Georgia in 2002. A native of Asia, the beetle transmits a pathogen that causes laurel wilt, a disease that can kill an infected tree in just a couple of years. The beetle attacks trees in the family Lauracea, which includes redbay, swampbay, sassafras and avocado.

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New technology to be explored at UK Winter Wheat Meeting

Grain growers will soon get a firsthand look at a new mobile tool to help them make real-time, informed decisions on their fields at the University of Kentucky Wheat Science Group’s annual winter meeting Jan. 6.

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Symposium in Savannah will highlight benefits of grafting for vegetables

The 3rd National Vegetable Grafting Symposium: “Growing New Roots for the Vegetable Industry in the U.S.” will be Jan. 8, 2015 at the Savannah International Trade and Convention Center in conjunction with the Southeast Regional Fruit and Vegetable Conference.

The symposium will feature presentations on propagation technology, decision making, grafting uses in season extension as well as successes and challenges from researchers, growers and industry members from the U.S. and around the world. Exhibitors will also be present that will be providing product and service information.

Read the rest of the story in Southeast Farm Press.