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    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
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Cover crop workshop in Live Oak, Florida

The University of Florida is hosting a workshop, “Using Cover Crops to Improve Soil Health, Weed Management and Integrated Pest Management Strategies,” on Thursday June 4th, from 4:00 pm to 8:30 pm at the Suwannee Valley Agricultural Extension Center (SVAEC) in Live Oak, FL.

Expand your knowledge of cover crops and how they can play an integral role in the health of your soil, weed suppression and in increasing the impact of beneficial organisms on managing crop pests. Learn from exciting research carried out at SVAEC and at a local blueberry farm. Explore the world of cover crops and the many benefits they can provide to your farm. Continue reading

Texas mosquito populations booming in rainy spring

In Southwest Farm Press

Break out the calamine lotion, sharpen your fingernails, be prepared to itch. Heavy rainfall this spring has created an ideal environment for mosquitoes to breed.

Better yet, do everything possible to avoid the pesky little biters that may do more than cause uncomfortable rashes and annoying itches. They can be deadly.

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Good soil health depends on cover crop mix

In Southeast Farm Press

Matt Poore continues to stress the importance of cover crop mixes on grazing land to both improve soil health and increase livestock nutrition.

During the Southeastern Soil Health Field Day held at Fork L Farm in Norwood, N.C. April 29, Poore showed a field where cattle graze that included a great deal of plant diversity, with 13 different species. “Is this always a good thing?” Poore asked.

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