Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) Regulated Area Expands to include Bledsoe and Cumberland Counties in Tennessee

Effective immediately, the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) is adding Bledsoe and Cumberland Counties in Tennessee to the list of regulated areas for the emerald ash borer (EAB). APHIS is taking this action in response to the detection of EAB in Bledsoe and Cumberland Counties.

To prevent the spread of EAB to other states, the attached Federal Order outlines specific conditions for the interstate movement of EAB-regulated articles from the quarantined areas in Tennessee. Specifically, the interstate movement of EAB-host wood and wood products from the quarantined areas in Tennessee is regulated, including firewood of all hardwood species, nursery stock, green lumber, waste, compost, and chips of ash species.

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Downy mildew makes E. coli more likely to contaminate lettuce

in USDA Agricultural Research Service News.

Escherichia coli O157:H7, a bacterium that causes foodborne illness in humans, is more likely to contaminate lettuce when downy mildew is already present, according to U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists.

Downy mildew, a lettuce disease caused by the fungus-like water mold Bremia lactucae, is one of the biggest problems that lettuce growers must deal with.

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iPIPE provides national pest warning system

A nationwide early warning and tracking system, the integrated Pest Information Platform (iPiPE) is making its debut across much of the United States. Research and extension specialists will implement the first phase of a five-year program designed to communicate observations of and management recommendations for various pests.

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Call for statements of interest for year 2 Crop Pest Programs for iPIPE

The iPIPE  call for statements of interest from potential year 2 Crop Pest Program coordinators is now active on the IPM Centers’ site at http://projects.ipmcenters.org/Southern/public/ViewRFA.cfm?rfaid=81

Application is pretty simple, with a 1-2 page statement of interest due online by 5 PM EDT August 21, 2015. With this statement of interest process we are assuming university administrations require local approval prior to Aug 21, but will have the opportunity to approve projects (or not) during a subsequent phase of the selection process.

Please share this information as you deem appropriate but especially with those who may be interested in participating in a CPP during the 2016 and 2017 seasons. Feel free to contact me or Scott Isard (Email: sai10@psu.edu  Phone: office & cell: 814-865-6290) with questions.

Drones will help farmers grow better crops

Farmers will be using drones in the near future to monitor and improve their crops to help feed a hungry world, say Texas A&M AgriLife Research scientists who are now developing the technology.

“Unmanned aerial vehicles, or drones, will soon play a major role in meeting the challenges of feeding a growing global population,” said Dr. Juan Enciso, an AgriLife Research irrigation engineer in Weslaco. Continue reading

Mississippi IPM specialists encourage farmers and beekeepers to communicate

In Delta Farm Press

by Kerri Collins Lewis, Mississippi State University

Pitting farmers against beekeepers does little to solve the problems facing pollinators. “In some cases, anti-pesticide groups are using the challenges facing bee health as an opportunity to set up a very black-and-white, good guy versus bad guy scenario when it comes to agricultural production,” said Angus Catchot, an entomologist with the Mississippi State University Extension Service.

“In the long run, this could hurt the average beekeeper in our area because that is the only story farmers are hearing in the media. It makes them wary of having beekeepers on their property or fearful of losing important crop production tools, such as neonicotinoid seed treatments.”

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APHIS Adds to List of Pests No Longer Regulated at U.S. Ports of Entry

USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service has added four pests to the list of Pests No Longer Regulated at U.S. Ports of Entry. As a result, APHIS will no longer take regulatory action on these organisms at ports of entry. This action is consistent with U.S. trade policy, and fulfills international agreements while promoting safe trade.

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