Bugwood Network makes it easier to use images from their database

If you’ve used Bugwood Network before to download photos to use in publications, websites or other applications, you’ll be pleased to know that they have recently revised their image site to make it more adaptable to a variety of uses. If you’ve never used any of their images, this free database containing thousands of images is definitely worth checking out.

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Assistant Professor Entomology position at the University of Florida

Title: Assistant Professor (Entomology)

Location:
Indian River Research and Education Center
University of Florida
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS)
Ft. Pierce, Florida

Salary:
Commensurate with Qualifications and Experience

Review Date:
To ensure full consideration please apply online and submit additional materials by December 15, 2015. Position will remain open until a viable applicant pool is determined. Continue reading

Conference on soil health and cover crops set for Oct. 28-29

In Delta Farm Press

The completion of harvest and cooler temperatures make the fall months a good time for farmers to examine their soils and consider planting cover crops to prevent winter erosion and build biomass.

The Arkansas Association of Conservation Districts and USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service are teaming up to present a conference on those topics at the Arkansas State University Convocation Center in Jonesboro, Ark., Oct. 28-29. Farmers from across the country are invited to attend.

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Crop rotation in cotton is a sound strategy

In Southwest Farm Press

Crop rotation may be one of the most basic production techniques for maintaining soil health and increasing productivity.

Over the years, experts have claimed reduced disease pressure, fewer weeds, less insect damage, and improved nutrient levels on fields that farmers routinely rotated from one crop to another.

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Sugarcane aphids are becoming a problem in South Carolina

In Southeast Farm Press

This is the first year South Carolina grain sorghum farmers have had to deal with sugarcane aphids on a large scale. Clemson University Entomologist Francis Reay-Jones calls the sugarcane aphid one of the most devastating pests he’s seen, and it presents a great challenge because it is so difficult to control.

“The populations can expand extremely quickly and we’ve had problems in every county that we’ve had sorghum in,” Reay-Jones said at the Pee Dee Farm Field Day at the Pee Dee Research & Education Center Sept. 10 in Florence, S.C.

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