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  • Funded by USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture

    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
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Brush identification, control topic of July 7 webinar

by Kay Ledbetter, Texas A&M AgriLife

Brush Identification and Control Measures will be the name of a July 7 natural resources webinar conducted by the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service ecosystem science and management unit.

The webinar is a part of the Texas Range Webinar Series scheduled the first Thursday of each month from noon to 1 p.m., said Pete Flores, webinar coordinator in Corpus Christi. Continue reading

Fescue toxicosis can lead to summer slump

By Aimee Nielson, University of Kentucky

Tall fescue is a popular grass for Kentucky pastures for many reasons—it is hardy and tolerates drought, has a root system that aids in controlling erosion and can stand up to heavy grazing. Farmers can even stockpile it for winter grazing. However, an endophyte fungus that commonly infects the plant can affect livestock. Summertime tends to be peak time for fungus-related problems.

“Fescue toxicosis is the general term used for the clinical diseases that can affect cattle consuming endophyte-infected tall fescue,” said Michelle Arnold, ruminant extension veterinarian for the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment. “Something important for Kentucky producers to watch for is a syndrome frequently referred to as ‘summer slump.’ Affected cattle appear hot with labored respiration (open mouth and/or rapid breathing) and excessive salivation. They avoid grazing during the day and seek shade or mud wallows to find relief from heat.” Continue reading

Pest Risk Analyst Intern – NCSU

The Center for Integrated Pest Management at North Carolina State University is seeking a temporary Pest Risk Analyst Intern.

The primary responsibility of this position will be to research, write, and present reports on various arthropods and plant pathogens, which will be used to develop a model for prioritizing exotic plant pests. The person in this position will work closely with a team of pest risk analysts at the USDA’s Center for Plant Health Science and Technology. The work will involve performing literature searches, reviewing and interpreting highly technical scientific information and government reports, corresponding with subject matter experts, and analyzing information to produce written reports that will then be presented to a team of analysts. Continue reading

Entomological Society provides information on the Asian tiger mosquito

This week is National Mosquito Control Awareness Week, and the Entomological Society of America is supporting the effort with a special collection of articles about the Asian tiger mosquito.

Like its close relative Aedes aegypti, the Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus) has been in the news recently due to its ability to transmit pathogens that cause diseases such as Zika, dengue, and chikungunya. Unlike Aedes aegypti, which is mainly found in areas where the weather is warm year-round, Aedes albopictus can tolerate colder weather, and in the United States it is found as far north as New York and New Jersey. As its name implies, this invasive insect came to North America from Asia in the 1980s and has since become a well-established pest in many areas.

Read the rest of this post at Entomology Today

Open dates for suggestions to Plant Pest and Disease Management and Disaster Prevention Programs

The United States Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) announced today the dates of the fiscal year (FY) 2017 open period for submitting suggestions to implement Plant Pest and Disease Management and Disaster Prevention Programs of the 2014 Farm Bill. The FY 2017 open period will last six weeks from July 11, 2016, through August 19, 2016.  There will be $62.5 million available with at least $5 million going to the National Clean Plant Network (NCPN).  The open period for submitting NCPN project suggestions will be announced separately. Continue reading

Bayer Bee Care partners with Wildlife Society to plant pollinator-friendly flowers

In Southeast Farm Press

The Bayer Bee Care program and the Wildlife Society are working together toward the goal of planting 25 million pollinator-attractant wildflower seeds by the fall with the aim  of increasing nutrition options for honeybees.

The Wildlife Society will engage its nearly 10,000 members to identify key areas in the U.S. in need of more forage and announce where the millions of seeds will be planted at its 23rd Annual Conference in Raleigh, N.C., in October. The planting will occur later in the fall, just in time for the pollinator buffet to bloom and establish spring 2017 forage. Continue reading