Mitigating Insect Management Effects on Pollinators (Recorded Presentation)

by Scott Stewart, University of Tennessee

The Plant Management Network has released another online presentation in their “Focus on Cotton” series. This new 10 minute video offers suggestions on the steps that growers, pesticide applicators, and beekeepers can take to reduce any negative effects of pesticide applications on honey bees and other pollinators. Click on the link below to watch this presentation narrated by Scott Stewart.

http://www.plantmanagementnetwork.org/edcenter/seminars/cotton/Pollinators/

Sweetpotato whitefly already present in Florida and Georgia

In Southeast Farm Press

by Xavier Martini, Mathews Paret, Josh Freeman, UF/IFAS

Outbreaks of sweetpotato whiteflies have been recorded recently in the Florida Panhandle and south Georgia on tomatoes and other vegetables. This arrival of whitefly is quite unusual at this time of the year in the Florida Panhandle.

Whitefly densities usually increase in October when cotton is defoliated and soybean senesces. This early arrival of whiteflies requires attention given the recent outbreak of Q biotype whiteflies in the Florida landscape. Continue reading

Chronic wasting disease meetings set for Dalhart, Amarillo

by Kay Ledbetter, Texas A&M AgriLife

Several chronic wasting disease informational meetings will be held in the Panhandle in September by the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service and the Texas Animal Health Commission.

These informational meetings, which will address chronic wasting disease management, new Texas Parks and Wildlife Department regulations, and proposed Texas Animal Health Commission rules, will be held in Dalhart and Amarillo. Continue reading

Integrated Pest Management (IPM) for Hydroponics and Protected Agriculture

Managing Greenhouse and Protected Ag vegetable pests –

Predator and pest identification

Hands-on microscope observation and more! Continue reading

Research finding new ways to protect pollinator health

A USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture Impact Spotlight

September is National Honey Month and you can’t have honey without honey bees. There are direct links between the health of American agriculture and the health of bees and other pollinators.

Pollination is critical to the production of fruits, vegetables, and nuts, which are important parts of a healthy diet. Pollination by managed honey bee colonies adds at least $15 billion to the value of U.S. agriculture annually through increased yields and superior-quality harvests. Continue reading

Biotech regulations need review, says NC State scientist

by Nash Dunn, NC State University

In a new Policy Forum article in Science, NC State professor Jennifer Kuzma argues that federal authorities are missing an opportunity to revise outdated regulatory processes not fit for modern innovations in biotechnology, such as a current situation involving genetically engineered mosquitoes.

Earlier this summer, the Food and Drug Administration approved the engineered mosquitoes as a potential weapon in the fight against the Zika virus. Continue reading

UK Ag scientist honored with lifetime achievement award

by Carol Lea Spence, University of Kentucky

A life spent in discovery was recognized recently when the Tobacco Science Research Conference presented University of Kentucky Professor Emeritus George Wagner with its Lifetime Achievement Award at its 70th annual conference in Palm Beach Gardens, Florida.

From his laboratory in the Kentucky Tobacco Research and Development Center, Wagner has been a global leader in unlocking the mysteries of tobacco, making major contributions in the areas of cadmium accumulation, trichome gum studies and the discovery of anti-fungal peptides. The UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment professor has focused on many research topics that have commercial potential, pushing for his discoveries to be tested in field trials, so that others could profit from his work. Continue reading

Assistant professor position open at NC State University focusing on wood-destroying insects

The Department of Entomology & Plant Pathology at North Carolina State University invites applications for a 9-month tenure-track position at the Assistant Professor level. This faculty position is located on the main campus in Raleigh, North Carolina, and has a 70% research and 30% academic appointment. The position carries responsibilities for research relating to the biology and management of major wood-destroying arthropod pests of structures, mainly termites, but also including wood-infesting ants or beetles. Continue reading

Centers for Disease Control announces RFA for Vector-Borne Disease Regional Centers of Excellence

The Centers for Disease Control is sponsoring a funding opportunity for vector-borne disease regional Centers of Excellence.

The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to establish vector-borne disease (VBD) regional Centers of Excellence (COEs) aimed at building the capacity to address the problem of emerging and exotic vector-borne diseases in the U.S., including Zika virus infection. The specific goals of these centers are to: (1) conduct applied research to develop and validate effective VBD prevention and control tools and methods necessary to anticipate and respond to disease outbreaks; (2) train a cadre of public health
entomologists with the knowledge and skills required to rapidly detect and respond to VBD threats in the United States; and (3) build effective collaborations between academic communities and public health organizations at federal, state, and local levels for VBD surveillance, prevention, and response. The ultimate objective is for these centers to help generate the necessary knowledge and capacity to enable appropriate and timely local public health action for VBD to be taken throughout the U.S., given significant regional differences in vector ecology, disease transmission dynamics and resources. Continue reading

School integrated pest management featured prominently at eXtension’s I-Three Issue Corps

Children cartoonChildren’s health is at the forefront of every political discussion, every school board meeting and every school district decision. So when teachers want to help students learn about eating healthy foods by growing a garden, where do they go to make sure that the garden will be successful and healthy? Where do school maintenance professionals go to learn how to keep rodents and roaches from contaminating the food in the school cafeteria?

In a recent blog at the I-Three Issue Corps at eXtension, Kathy Murray, an entomologist with the Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry explains how the I-Three Corps Urban IPM project developed new tools and training resources for school staff and volunteers. Included in these resources is the ischoolpestmanager.org website that contains online learning modules and other documents to help a school pest management team successfully keep insect and mammal pests out of school.

Learn more about the I-Three Corps Urban IPM project and other school IPM websites available for school personnel by clicking here. And stay tuned for other blog posts about urban and school IPM at eXtension.