Call for Proposals for New Diversity and Inclusion Issue Corps

The eXtension Foundation is launching the first Issue Corps of 2017 with a call for proposals for projects on improving Diversity and Inclusion within Cooperative Extension, its partners, and the public. Proposals are due December 5, 2016.

The Issue Corps experience combines virtual and face-to-face events to assist corps members in developing projects that can have a visible, measurable impact at the local level. Emphasis is on developing innovative projects, programming, applications of technology and professional skills, enabling members to design and implement new approaches they might not have the opportunity pursue otherwise. Continue reading

Study shows importance of sustainable agriculture in preserving Gulf ecosystem

By Katie Pratt, University of Kentucky

Dissolved organic carbon that enters the ocean through river runoff is a necessary food for aquatic microbes that are vital to water quality and health. However, too much dissolved organic carbon is not a good thing for water quality or for aquatic life.

From 1901 to 2010, the amount of dissolved organic carbon entering the Gulf of Mexico from the Mississippi River increased by 40 percent. A University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment researcher led a study that shows the increase is mainly due to human activity but sustainable agricultural practices are slowing the increase compared to previous ones. Continue reading

Surprise attack by redbanded stink bugs inspires new thresholds in Mississippi

by Bonnie Coblentz, MSU Extension Service

A game-changing insect caused significant problems in many Mississippi soybean acres, but good management allowed growers to finish the year with an average crop.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture estimated that by Oct. 23, Mississippi farmers were 92 percent finished harvesting the state’s soybean crop, which covered about 2.03 million acres this year. Insect and disease pressures made the effort challenging, but USDA predicts growers will harvest a state average of 48 bushels an acre. Continue reading

Time-lapsed imaging may help growers detect citrus greening

in Southeast Farm Press

by Brad Buck, University of Florida

A time-lapse polarized imaging system may help citrus growers detect greening before the plant’s leaves show symptoms, which should help growers as they try to fend off the deadly disease.

For the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences study shows, Won Suk “Daniel” Lee and Alireza Pourreza wanted to know how early citrus leaves with greening can be detected while they are pre-symptomatic. So they inoculated plants with the greening disease and put those leaves through a time-lapse imaging system. Continue reading

Target spot lowered soybean yields in Arkansas this year

by David Bennett, Delta Farm Press

While more producers push past 100-bushel-per-acre soybean yields, a problem disease appears to have kept a lid on the potential of many northeast Arkansas fields. Target spot, once thought a negligible problem, is now making its mark.

Dr. Lanny Ashlock, retired University of Arkansas soybean specialist and current chairman of the Natural Soybean and Grain Alliance, “couldn’t be happier that more and more growers are participating in (the state’s yield contest), and going over, 100 bushels.” Continue reading

Addressing indoor environmental issues may be key to controlling asthma

in AAP News

by Stuart L. Abramson, M.D., Ph.D., AE-C, FAAP

Two mothers who don’t know each other complain about their kids getting sick when they returned to elementary school from summer vacation. Both children had significant worsening of asthma, and their parents wanted to home-school them because of this problem. Environmental assessment showed extremely high levels of dust mite allergen and mold in carpeted areas. After remediation, the children returned to school without further significant asthma problems. Continue reading

UGA’s Culpepper to receive prestigious award

by Clint Thompson, University of Georgia

World-renowned researcher Stanley Culpepper, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension weed scientist on the UGA Tifton Campus, will receive the 2016 regional Excellence in Extension Award from the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU).

Culpepper is this year’s Southern Region recipient – he’s one of five national recipients of the award – and will be recognized at the 129th APLU meeting in Austin, Texas, on Nov. 13. Continue reading