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  • Funded by USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture

    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
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Western Region IR-4 Coordinator position still open

The University of California at Davis is still looking for qualified candidates to fill an Associate Director/Field Research Coordinator position. This person will lead the IR-4 program in the western region.

For those unfamiliar with the IR-4 program, this is a really important program funded by the USDA and the Land Grant Universities to help ensure specialty crop growers gain registered uses of reduced risk crop protection chemicals.  There are program areas in food crops, ornamental crops and also biopesticides.  This position helps lead and coordinate research and prioritize ag industry pest control needs for 13 western states and several Pacific island territories.

For more information about the position, including links to the application form, please see http://ucanr.edu/blogs/blogcore/postdetail.cfm?postnum=22336 .

High tunnel tomatoes being sold at Texas supermarket

by Kay Ledbetter, Texas A&M AgriLife

Dr. Charlie Rush is claiming success – tomatoes from a Texas A&M AgriLife Research high tunnel project are being sold in an Amarillo grocery store.

And now the real work begins.

“We delivered tomatoes to United Supermarket in Amarillo, and they were thrilled to get them,” Rush said. “The next day we delivered jalapenos and poblano peppers. We can produce a quality product and there is clearly a market for the produce. Continue reading

New sensor detects citrus greening before symptoms appear

In Growing Produce

by Paul Rusnak

Nearly two years ago, news arose that University of Florida researchers had developed a tool to help growers combat citrus greening: an electronic sensor. Today, a new study shows the time-lapse polarized imaging system may indeed detect greening before the plant’s leaves show symptoms.

For the study, Won Suk “Daniel” Lee and Alireza Pourreza were seeking to know how early citrus leaves with greening can be detected while they are pre-symptomatic. So they inoculated plants with the greening disease and put those leaves through a time-lapse imaging system.
There, they found starch in the leaves, an early sign of greening, said Pourreza, a former post-doctoral researcher in the UF/IFAS Agricultural and Biological Engineering Department. In their study, UF/IFAS researchers detected greening about one month after they infected the trees, he said. Continue reading

PPO herbicide-resistant pigweed found in St. Louis

In Delta Farm Press

Palmer amaranth with multiple herbicide resistance is nothing new to the Mid-South. But farther north, the recent discovery of pigweed resistant to glyphosate and PPO herbicides was novel.

Where and how was the pigweed found? Continue reading