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  • Funded by USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture

    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
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Texas workshop focuses on pest control and water quality

by Kathleen Phillips, Texas A&M AgriLife

A five-hour continuing education event will be offered Dec. 8 at the Jackson County Services Building auditorium, 411 N. Wells, Edna.

The event, from 9 a.m.-3 p.m., is hosted by the Field Crops and Beef committees of the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service’s Jackson County office, according to Michael Hiller, AgriLife Extension agent. Continue reading

Texas specialists look at lentils as possibility in crop rotation

by Kay Ledbetter, Texas A&M AgriLife

Just as lentils add variety to a soup, Dr. Emi Kimura believes they could add variety to the crop options for wheat producers in the Rolling Plains.

Lentils are legumes that grow in pods on a bushy plant, and as a legume, they are high in nitrogen, which would be beneficial for the following wheat crop, Kimura, a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service agronomist in Vernon, said. Continue reading

Webinar: Combating Cockroaches in your school

Sponsored by the Environmental Protection Agency, this webinar will break down the simple steps of implementing a comprehensive integrated pest management program. Presenters will address monitoring, sanitation, maintenance and exclusion — actions that, when performed regularly, will result in a healthier school environment and a less likely place for cockroaches to call home.

When:  Tuesday, December 13, 2016

Time:  2:00 PM – 3:30 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada) Continue reading

How to combat Zika and protect the environment – at the same time

by Lisa Gross, Ensia

County public health officials in South Carolina weren’t thinking about bees in August, when they realized that four residents in a single town had returned from travel abroad infected with Zika. Like health officials around the world, they were thinking of the babies born with heartbreaking birth defects in Brazil. And they were thinking about mosquitoes.

After reports emerged in January that thousands of Brazilian infants had been born with microcephaly, a debilitating neurodevelopmental condition marked by severely stunted head and brain growth, the World Health Organization declared an international public health emergency to figure out why. Scientists thought Zika might be a cause, and within months the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention confirmed that it was. Continue reading

Bacterial wilt killing blueberry crops in Florida

by Paul Rusnak, Growing Produce

There is a new threat Florida blueberry growers should be wary of: bacterial wilt. In a memo sent to members of the Florida Blueberry Growers Association, President Dudley Calfee strongly advised growers to scout fields thoroughly for this “new and dangerous pathogen.”

The disease has initially been confirmed on three farms, two in Desoto County and one in Lake County. On all three farms, the variety ‘Arcadia’ was the most severely affected, according to Phil Harmon, UF/IFAS Plant Pathologist. Other varieties also may be susceptible, but additional research is needed before we will know for sure. Continue reading