• Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 1,744 other followers

  • Southern IPM blog posts

    January 2017
    M T W T F S S
    « Dec   Feb »
     1
    2345678
    9101112131415
    16171819202122
    23242526272829
    3031  
  • Funded by USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture

    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
  • Southern IPM Tweets

    Error: Twitter did not respond. Please wait a few minutes and refresh this page.

Alabama offers funding for feral hog management

In Southeast Farm Press

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resources Conservation Service recently announced that eligible landowners interested in Alabama’s Wild Pig Damage Management Program should apply for financial assistance by Jan. 20.

Environmental Quality Incentives Program funding for 2017 supports the initiative.

Feral swine have been sighted in most of Alabama’s 67 counties and reproduce at an alarming rate. Sows begin breeding at six months of age and produce up to four litters per year with each litter consisting of four to 12 piglets. Wild pig rooting damages native plant communities that provide habitat and food sources for indigenous wildlife species. Additionally, wild hogs degrade water quality and pose a serious disease threat to humans and livestock.

“Although we have a somewhat fair guess of the damage that wild pigs cause to agriculture – about $1.5 billion per year – I suspect their impact to natural ecosystems and the environment likely double or triple that figure,” said Dr. Mark Smith, Auburn University (AU) Extension specialist and associate professor.

Alabama landowners can apply for financial assistance through EQIP to monitor and manage feral swine on their property.

For application guidelines, see the original article.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: