Webinar: Managing target spot in cotton: results of a USDA NIFA-funded study

Target spot, which is caused by the fungus Corynespora cassiicola, is an emerging disease in cotton in the Lower and Mid-South in the U.S. Phylogenetically, C. cassiicola isolates collected from cotton across the Lower South are distinct from those collected from other crops, particularly vegetables. This suggests that C. cassiicola isolates from cotton are either a recent introduction to the U.S. or has arisen from a mutation. Rainfall patterns along with variety selection and management inputs relating to yield potential influence the target spot risk in cotton. Greatest target spot-attributed defoliation and subsequent yield losses, which may exceed 300 pounds of lint per acre, have been recorded for an intensively managed, susceptible variety having a yield potential above 2.5 to 3 bales per acre.

Dr. Austin Hagan of Auburn University will discuss the results of a two-year study on developing integrated strategies for managing target spot in cotton. Topics that will be addressed in the webinar will include disease distribution, variety susceptibility and potential yield loss, efficacy of registered and candidate fungicides, fungicide application number, timing, methodology, and placement, as well as the influence of cotton cropping frequency, tillage practices, seeding rate, and planting date on disease development and cotton yield. Continue reading

Tree care conference set for Feb. 24 in Grand Prairie, TX

by Adam Russell, Texas A&M AgriLife

Commercial and municipal arborists who want to learn more about the evolution of tree care should attend the 2017 North Central Texas Urban Forestry Conference scheduled for Feb. 24 in Grand Prairie.

The conference, which will highlight aspects of urban forestry and tree care, is a coordinated collaborative effort among the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service, Texas A&M Forest Service, Trinity Blacklands Urban Forestry Council, Cross Timbers Urban Forestry Council and the city of Grand Prairie. Continue reading

Webinar: PAM: a bioeconomic decision-support tool for guiding the management of Palmer amaranth

Herbicide resistance in Palmer amaranth (known as Palmer pigweed) is a serious issue in the Southern US and is spreading to several other states. Repeated use of a few herbicide mechanisms of action (MOA) without sufficient management diversity is the common cause of this resistance. A proactive resistance management strategy that integrates diverse chemical and non-chemical tools will help prevent/manage resistance and preserve the utility of available herbicide options.

This webinar provides a general overview and demonstration of a new Microsoft-Excel based decision support tool that guides informed decision making for effective management of this weed, with particular focus on soil seedbank management and profitability. Users can build their own management programs and see for themselves how effective their pigweed management program is, as well as overall economic outcomes associated with their options. This tool also predicts the likely risk of resistance for the management program built by the user. Continue reading

Field Crops Entomologist position available at Louisiana State

WORK LOCATION: The position will be based at the Tom H. Scott Research and Extension Center near Winnsboro, LA. Opportunities for research and extension activities exist at three research stations in the Region and in the Department of Entomology on campus in Baton Rouge, LA. The Regions’ field stations include over 1,000 acres of crops with research and extension demonstrations focusing on agronomic production and integrated pest management of arthropods, plant pathogens and weeds. Research projects will be located at both research stations with opportunities to expand that work to other regions of Louisiana. Laboratory and office space will be available in the Department of Entomology.

POSITION DESCRIPTION: Full-time 12 month, tenure-track position with a 70% extension and 30% research appointment. The successful candidate will be responsible for the development and implementation of pest management programs for insect pests of field crops in northeast Louisiana, including corn, cotton, soybean, and grain sorghum. The extension component will also include statewide contact responsibilities for one or more of these primary commodities. The position will provide leadership and work with producers and other LSU AgCenter personnel to plan and organize a well-balanced Extension educational program. The scientist is responsible for working with advisory committees to identify clientele needs, to develop programs that respond to those needs, and to assess program impact. The position will disseminate LSU AgCenter recommendations and provide current content to commodity web pages. Technology transfer and outreach to stakeholders must be accomplished with web content, social media, agricultural trade magazines and traditional extension methods (newsletters, blogs, oral delivery and formal extension publications). Continue reading