Extension Assist/Associate Professor – Tree Fruit Entomology

Job Description:

The Stockbridge School of Agriculture at the University of Massachusetts Amherst is seeking applications for a full-time Extension Assistant/Associate Professor in entomology. The successful candidate will collaborate with faculty, Extension specialists, industry, non-profits and government agencies to develop and deliver informational and educational materials to support the commercial tree fruit industry, and conduct original research related to insect pest management and ecology, with an emphasis on sustainable methods, particularly integrated pest management. The candidate will develop and teach two courses in entomology. The candidate will develop a research program in support of this goal, and provide educational programming in collaboration with other members of the UMass Fruit Program, Stockbridge School of Agriculture faculty and staff, Extension and industry. This will include publishing in scientific and trade journals and education through face-to-face and electronic delivery. The candidate will acquire extra-mural funding to support research and Extension programs. The candidate will participate as a full member of the University of Massachusetts faculty in a 12-month, non-tenure track. We share a fundamental commitment to teach and serve a diverse student body, professional practitioners and the broader public. Continue reading

Job: Field plant ecologist

The Fire Ecology Program of Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy (Tallahassee, Florida) is seeking a field plant ecologist for a two-year grant-funded position.  The purpose of the project is to determine the effects of time since restoration of pine savanna on plant species composition, soil characteristics, and associated ecosystem services.  Continue reading

Registration open for Ohio River Valley Woodlands and Wildlife Workshop

by Carol Lea Spence, University of Kentucky

The Ohio River Valley Woodlands and Wildlife Workshop returns to Kentucky on March 25.

This year’s workshop, a tri-state event covering Kentucky, Indiana and Ohio, will be held in the Boone County Cooperative Extension Enrichment Center in Burlington. Forestry experts will provide an array of forestry- and wildlife-related educational sessions to help woodland owners get the most from their properties. Continue reading

Mid-winter weed IPM

From the Georgia Center for Urban Agriculture

by Greg Huber, University of Georgia

Weeds can be a major pest of lawns and recreation fields, competing for resources and sunlight while detracting from their natural beauty.

If your spring checklist includes lawn weed management, now is the time to take a closer look at the tiny mat of weed seedlings forming in mid-winter (Jan-Feb.), especially during spells of mild weather and precipitation. The winter-weed inventory is likely to include a mix of early-stage cool-season annual and perennial weeds such as chickweed, henbit, clover, annual bluegrass, burweed, and wild garlic. One advantage of mid-winter weed scouting and management is that many weeds are in the early growth stages and can be effectively controlled by herbicide treatments. In addition, warm-season turfgrasses such as bermudagrass and zoysiagrass are dormant and less susceptible to herbicide injury than during spring green up. Mid-winter is an excellent time to scout for cool-season weed species and get an early jump on management while conditions are favorable. Continue reading

Fungus on tall fescue may cause losses in livestock

in Southeast Farm Press

Tall fescue is a popular grass used for grazing, hay and erosion control in the eastern United States, but one Clemson University expert believes this grass could be responsible for more than $1 billion per year in livestock production losses.

Tall fescue is a perennial bunch-type grass that grows rapidly during spring and fall. The majority of tall fescue plants contain a fungus that creates compounds which are beneficial to the plants, but toxic to livestock. The compounds created by the fungus are called “ergot alkaloids.” Susan Duckett, a professor of animal and veterinary sciences, and some of her students are conducting a study on the impact of these compounds on fetal development and postnatal growth of livestock that graze on tall fescue. Continue reading

APHIS Extends Comment Period for Proposed Rule on Importation of Hass Avocados From Colombia

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) is extending the comment period for a proposed rule that would allow the importation of Hass avocados from Colombia into the continental United States. We are also notifying the public of the availability of a revised pest risk assessment (PRA) and risk management document (RMD) associated with the proposed rule. Continued analysis by APHIS shows that the proposed importation of Hass avocados from Colombia poses a minimal risk of introducing pests of concern, including the pink hibiscus mealybug, into the United States. Extending the comment period will allow interested persons time to review the new information and to submit comments by the new closing date of March 20, 2017. Continue reading