• Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 1,410 other followers

  • Southern IPM blog posts

    March 2017
    M T W T F S S
    « Feb    
     12345
    6789101112
    13141516171819
    20212223242526
    2728293031  
  • Funded by USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture

    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
  • Southern IPM Tweets

The spread of mosquito borne diseases in the U.S.

Excerpted from Entomology Today

A team of researchers from Brazil and Argentina propose several ideas for the many mosquito-borne disease outbreaks in a paper recently published in the Journal of Medical Entomology. Continue reading

What do farmers think about resistant weeds?

in Southeast Farm Press

Both scientists and regulators have had a lot to say about the growing problem of herbicide resistance and how weed management techniques need to change in response. However, there have been few organized opportunities for farmers to make their voices heard and to share their experiences in managing herbicide-resistant weeds.

This is changing with a series of seven regional listening sessions sponsored by the Weed Science Society of America, the United Soybean Board and the U.S. Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. Farmers across the nation are being invited to share their challenges, successes and opinions. Continue reading

New Mid-Atlantic Soybean Disease Scouting Guide Available

by , Virginia Tech

A Mid-Atlantic Soybean Disease Scouting Guide was recently developed by Extension Plant Pathologists from Virginia Tech and the University of Delaware in cooperation with the state Soybean Boards and the Soybean Checkoff. An online version of the guide can be found here:

Mid-Atlantic Soybean Disease Scouting Guide

Hard copies of the guide are available at the Virginia Tech Tidewater AREC, and requests for guides can be sent to Dr. Hillary Mehl (hlmehl@vt.edu). These will also be available at grower meetings and field days in 2017.

Spotted Lanternfly national pest alert published

The spotted lanternfly is an invasive sap-feeding planthopper, first discovered in the United States in Berks County, Pennsylvania in 2014. Field observations indicate that the tree of heaven, Ailanthus altissima, is an important host plant; however the spotted lanternfly is known to feed on a wide range of hosts including wild and cultivated grapes, stone fruits, willow, and various hardwoods. This species is thought to be native to China, and has spread to other Asian countries. In 2004, it was first detected in Korea, where its populations expanded and it became an economically important pest of grapevines and fruit trees. In Korea, it damaged plants directly by phloem feeding, but also caused indirect damage due to mold that grew on honeydew excretions deposited on the leaves and fruits of host plants. It was recorded utilizing 67 host plant species in Korea, many of which also occur in the U.S. Given the wide range of hosts it feeds upon, the spotted lanternfly poses a serious economic threat to multiple U.S. industries, including viticulture, fruit trees, ornamentals and timber.

For the complete alert click on this link.

European Cherry Fruit Fly national pest alert published

The European cherry fruit fly, Rhagoletiscerasi (Linnaeus) (Diptera: Tephritidae), is a new invasive insect to North America. Its first confirmation in North America was in an urban park in Mississauga, Ontario in June 2016. The likely mode of entry was in imported fresh cherries or other host plant material. This pest occurs throughout most of continental Europe and central and western Asia, and is the most economically important pest of sweet cherries in Europe. It exclusively attacks the fruit of host plants.

European cherry fruit fly has not yet been detected in the U.S., although it has been intercepted more than 100 times at U.S. ports of entry (58 interceptions since 2000), with all interceptions occurring on Prunus spp. fruit found in passenger baggage.

For the complete alert click on this link.