Director, Mosquito Control Division Department of Solid Waste Management, Miami, FL

Nature of work

This is a highly responsible position directing the countywide mosquito control functions within the Department of Solid Waste Management. The position is responsible for providing strategic, operational and administrative leadership for the County’s Mosquito Control Program by closely collaborating with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Florida Department of Health, Florida Department of Agriculture, local, state, national and international entities, to establish and implement goals, strategies, action plans and policies for the control and eradication of mosquitoes and mosquito-borne illnesses, to include exploration of emerging technologies. Continue reading

SARE Funding in Your State

Since 1988, SARE has awarded $245 million for more than 6,100 research and education initiatives led by innovative farmers, ranchers, researchers and educators who are committed to improving agriculture’s profitability, stewardship and quality of life.

SARE Grants Funded in Your State. Continue reading

2017 All Bugs Good and Bad Webinar Series: Mosquitoes and Insect Borne Diseases

In this webinar, Dr. Derrick Mathias, Assistant Professor, Auburn University will discuss medically important mosquitoes and mosquito-borne viruses endemic to and threatening the Southeast. Learn about mosquito ecology, virus transmission, signs and symptoms of mosquito borne illnesses and how to assess your risk of infection.  Moderated by Ellen Huckabay and Lucy Edwards, Regional Extension Agents, Alabama Extension. Click here to login as a guest and participate in the live event.   Note: on April 7th, the link to the live webinar opens about 15 minutes before the webinar. If you try to log in earlier, you will get an error message.

When: Friday, April 7 at 2:00 pm EDT Continue reading

Air Potato Biological Control program seeking collaborators

The Florida Department of Agriculture has an active biological control program for air potato, Dioscorea bulbifera, that has been implemented successfully throughout Florida, Georgia and Louisiana. They are mass-producing a chrysomelid beetle, Lilioceris cheni, which feeds mainly on the foliage along with some feeding of the weed’s aerial propagules.  This beetle has been shown to be highly specific to this single yam species.  Significant impacts have been noticed in total vine-length, propagule mass, and increases in plant diversity on sites that have L. cheni populations controlling this weed.  Additionally, there is another beetle species, L. egena, with larvae that develop within the aerial propagules which has recently been submitted to TAG for approval and may be available in the coming year as well. Continue reading

Southern IPM Coordinators release their pest management priorities for 2017

IPM Coordinators in the Southern Region updated a list of the major insect pest, disease and weed issues that researchers and extension specialists should try to address in the coming year. During their annual meeting on March 15 at the Southeastern Branch Entomological Society of America meeting, IPM Coordinators reviewed the current Southern Region priorities while sharing some of the challenges in their state.

The coordinators belong to a regional committee called the Southern Extension and Research Activities (SERA) 003. Each major region of the country—south, northeast, north central and west—has a similar regional committee. Continue reading

Have a red maple? Become a citizen scientist!

If you have a red maple (Acer rubrum) in your yard, and a few minutes of free time per year we would like your help in monitoring tree growth for A Tree’s Life, a citizen-science project.

Trees provide a suite of ecosystem services that improve human and environmental health. However, urban trees are subject to environmental stressors, including increased temperatures and drought, which reduce these services and make tree more susceptible to arthropod pests. The objectives of A Tree’s Life are to understand how climate and urbanization affect tree pests, growth, and health, and thus ecological services like carbon sequestration and air and water filtration. This project was recently funded by the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture’s Southern IPM Center in Raleigh, North Carolina. Continue reading