Revised Label Language for Pesticide Products in Water Soluble Packaging to Protect Handlers

The Environmental Protection Agency has sent a letter to registrants of products with water soluble packaging (WSP) with revised instructions to be placed on the label of those products. When used properly, WSP can significantly reduce handler exposure during the mixing and loading of pesticides, qualifying it as a closed mixing/loading system under the Agricultural Worker Protection Standard. However, some unintended practices in the field are actually increasing the risks, negating the intention of the technology.

EPA worked with state officials and a task force of pesticide registrants to examine the issue and develop the improved language in order to eliminate misuse and protect handlers. Continue reading

1890 Institution Teaching, Research and Extension Capacity Building Grants (CBG) Program

The 1890 CBG is intended to strengthen teaching, research and extension programs in the food and agricultural sciences by building the institutional capacities of the 1890 Land-Grant Institutions, including Tuskegee University, West Virginia State University, and Central State University (per Section 7129 of Pub. L. 113-79). The CBG program supports projects that strengthen teaching programs in the food and agricultural sciences in the need areas of curriculum design and materials development, faculty development, and others. CBG supports projects that strengthen research and extension programs in need areas of studies and experimentation, extension program development support systems, and others. The CBG also support integrated project grants. The intent of this initiative is to increase and strengthen food and agriculture sciences at the 1890s through integration of education, research and extension. Applications submitted to CBG must address at least one of the following NIFA strategic goals: sustainable bioenergy; food security; childhood obesity prevention; or food safety. See RFA for details. Continue reading

Zika Risk in Texas Rises with Temperatures

As the state prepares for additional local transmission of the Zika virus during the 2017 mosquito season, the Texas Department of State Health Services is expanding its testing guidance for residents of six South Texas counties.

DSHS Monday issued a health alert that now recommends testing all pregnant residents of Cameron, Hidalgo, Starr, Webb, Willacy and Zapata counties in both the first and second trimesters of pregnancy and any resident who has a rash plus at least one other common Zika symptom: fever, joint pain or eye redness. Continue reading