Saving Costs with Cover Crops

In ARS News

Cotton farmers in Alabama who use cover crops have a new, cost-cutting option. They can kill their cover crops and plant their cotton in the same pass through a field, according to Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists.

Cover crops are gaining in popularity because they suppress weeds and help retain moisture and nutrients. Farmers typically plant cover crops in the fall and kill them in the spring by flattening them with a roller, spraying them with herbicides, or both. After killing the cover crop, growers plant a cash crop in the same field. That usually requires two passes of a tractor: one to kill the cover crop and another a few weeks later to plant the cash crop. Continue reading

NIFA Announces $6 Million for Research on Plant-Biotic Interactions

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) today announced the availability of approximately $6 million to support agriculturally relevant research on the symbiotic relationship between plants and other living organisms. The Plant-Biotic Interactions program is a joint funding opportunity established through a partnership between NIFA and the National Science Foundation.

There are more than three decades of research on the molecular mechanisms that inform the interactions of plants, microbes, and invertebrates. “There is a continued need for applied tools and technologies to sustain and improve agriculture for a growing world population,” said Sonny Ramaswamy, director of NIFA. The Plant-Biotic Interactions program will support fundamental and applied research to provide a deeper understanding of these complex interactions. Research may lead to novel cropping systems that help plants extract nutrients from their environments, ward off diseases, and thrive in the face of extreme environmental conditions. Continue reading

North American Invasive Species Forum Live Broadcast

The North American Invasive Species Forum will be broadcasted live on YouTube at:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1-00fx2iFTprXsi9Vo8e52R31lqEUbhm

The forum takes place May 9-11.

This includes the Invasive Species Data Sharing Workshop on Monday and the Forum presentations the rest of the week.

Thanks to the team at the University of Georgia – Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health for making this happen.

New apiary on Centennial Campus teaches bee management

by Carla Davis, NC State University

The newest buzz at NC State is emanating from nearly 150,000 honeybees that now call Centennial Campus home.

On the day before Earth Day, a new community apiary with seven honeybee hives was inaugurated on Main Campus Drive between the Hunt Library and Lake Raleigh. Under the high noon sun, leaders from university offices and local businesses donned beekeeping jackets, veils and gloves to release the bees on campus. Continue reading

Job opening: Field Development Scientist II- Turf, Ornamental and Pest Control

The Field Development Scientist role supporting Pest Control, Vector, Turf, and Ornamental field-based in Texas is posted.  Please review and share with professionals who may be interested.  The link to the job is:  https://career.bayer.us/job/Field-Development-Scientist-II-Turf-Ornamental-and-Pest-Control–SF5252.html

In addition, Bayer offers a referral bonus if your referral is hired.  Referral must be submitted through talent finder in the Bayer intranet.  Please visit http://talentfinder.intranet.cnb/en/about-talentfinder/ to learn more.

Industrial Hemp 24th Annual Conference Announced

ASA, CSSA, and the University of Kentucky are pleased to announce a partnership with Hemp Industries Association (HIA) on their 24th Annual Conference in Lexington, Kentucky, September 9-11, 2017.

The three-day conference brings together industrial hemp science, industry, and policy experts for the first time to “Share the Vision”.  Continue reading

Bed bugs happen, even in school

by Mike Merchant, Texas A&M AgriLife

Bed bugs happen even in your children’s school, and like it or not we’re all going to have to deal with it. That will mean fighting the inclination to go into hyper-protective parent mode. Instead we all need to relax.  Deep breaths.  Eyes closed. Find your center.  Breeeathe… it will be all right.

It doesn’t matter what kind of school our kids attend, there’s a good chance that sooner or later you’ll hear rumors of bed bugs on campus.  I say this with some confidence because, in case you haven’t heard, these tiny, bloodsucking pests have become something of an epidemic over the past 15 years.  It’s inevitable that sooner or later children who live in infested homes will bring bed bugs to school.  While statistics are few, the numbers of public and private schools reporting problems appear to be on the rise. Continue reading