Wheat streak mosaic, volunteer issues to be highlighted at May 17 field day

by Kay Ledbetter, Texas A&M AgriLife

During the May 17 Wheat Field Day, Texas A&M AgriLife Research will highlight a “real-life” research study that will provide a firsthand look at what happens when volunteer wheat is not controlled.

The field day will begin in the Porter Wheat Building at the AgriLife Research farm west of Bushland with registration at 8:30 a.m. and tours at 9 a.m. After two hours of tours, attendees will be welcomed to visit several booths and posters before a noon lunch and program. Continue reading

Northeastern IPM Center presents “The IPM Toolbox” Spring Webinar Series

Got an IPM question? Need to know the latest IPM information? The Northeastern IPM Center has got the answers with their spring webinar series, “The IPM Toolbox.” They’ve asked the experts to join us online for an hour of dialogue about an effective IPM practice, method, or effort.

We have three webinars scheduled this month… Continue reading

APHIS Adds Kane, Kendall, LaSalle, and Will Counties, Illinois, to the Gypsy Moth (Lymantria dispar) Regulated Area

Effective immediately, the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) is adding Kane, Kendall, LaSalle, and Will Counties in Illinois to the list of regulated areas for the gypsy moth (GM). The GM population in each of these counties has reached the threshold to trigger the regulated area.

To prevent the further spread of GM, the attached Federal Order establishes Kane, Kendall, LaSalle, and Will Counties in Illinois as regulated areas. Effective immediately, all interstate movement of GM-regulated articles from Kane, Kendall, LaSalle, and Will Counties must be handled in accordance with the attached Federal Order. Illinois has established a parallel state quarantine. Continue reading

Floodwater mosquitoes may be a problem in areas of heavy rain

Southwest Farm Press

by Leilana McKindra, Southwest Farm Press

A wave of dangerous storms that recently rolled through the state brought large amounts rain and snow, and may have sparked a rise in the population of giant pests known as floodwater mosquitoes.

Common in Oklahoma, floodwater mosquitoes, sometimes called gallinippers, can grow up to six times larger than common mosquitoes. Continue reading