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  • Funded by USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture

    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
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USDA Invests $17.5 Million for Resilient Rural Communities and a Sustainable Agriculture Economy

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) today announced 47 grants totaling nearly $17.5 million to improve sustainable agriculture and help rural communities thrive. The funding is made possible through NIFA’s Agriculture and Food Research Initiative (AFRI) program, authorized by the 2014 Farm Bill.

“A number of factors are involved in achieving economic success in rural communities,” said NIFA Director Sonny Ramaswamy. “These NIFA investments will help us understand the social and behavioral factors that inform decision-making in agriculture, which can help rural communities thrive.” Continue reading

Hybridized cotton reverses resistance of pink bollworm to Bt cotton

in Southwest Farm Press

Researchers with the University of Arizona and China discovered a surprising strategy to reverse pink bollworm resistance to genetically engineered cotton.

Cotton growers have been able to use genetically engineered cotton to fight the pink bollworm. This has happened as scientists have been able to produce pest-killing proteins from the widespread soil bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis, or Bt. Without adequate countermeasures, scientists have discovered that pests can quickly evolve resistance. Continue reading

Deadline June 5 – Submit your nominations for IPM Symposium Awards

The organizers of the 9th International IPM Symposium are seeking nominations for the IPM Achievement Awards.  These awards recognize practitioners who have made outstanding achievements in IPM adoption, implementation, and program maintenance. In 2002, the USDA, along with its stakeholders, developed a national roadmap for IPM, which was revised in 2013. This roadmap has provided direction for practitioners who specialize in IPM for research, implementation of new technology, and measurement of success in management of all types of pests, including but not limited to agricultural, structural, veterinary, ornamental, forest and public health pests. The success of an IPM program depends on how well it follows the USDA NIFA IPM Roadmap, engenders stakeholder support, and increases IPM adoption and implementation. IPM practitioners who have achieved excellence fully support the IPM roadmap and garner stakeholders to help with program implementation and team building. Continue reading

Wondering what has been going on with your juniper and cypress trees?

by Adam Russell, Texas A&M AgriLife

It’s been a tough 2017 so far for juniper and cypress varieties used in landscapes, as pests and diseases make the rounds, causing blight and tree die-offs.

Kevin Ong, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service plant pathologist and director of the Texas Plant Disease Diagnostic Laboratory in College Station, said there are several different possible disease or pest issues plaguing juniper and cypress varieties around the state, from the Gulf Coast to Central, North and East Texas. Continue reading

Preventative measures can help protect against mosquito bites

by Katie Pratt, University of Kentucky

Mosquitoes are appearing earlier than normal this year. University of Kentucky entomologists encourage Kentuckians to take precautions to prevent mosquito bites on themselves and their pets.

“Mosquitoes breed in standing water. The recent rains we have had, coupled with the upcoming warm weather, may help them get off to a strong start,” said Grayson Brown, entomologist in the UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment. Continue reading