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  • Funded by USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture

    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
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Snake sighting? Keep calm and mow on to avoid unwanted human and snake interactions

by Michael J. Wheeler, University of Georgia

Not many animals elicit the extreme emotional response that snakes do, but the truth is they’re an ordinary part of the landscape in Georgia.

They live in every corner of the state and serve an important purpose in the ecosystem, whether that ecosystem is a suburban backyard or an isolated pine forest. Without them, Georgia would have an overpopulation of rodents and other pests. Continue reading

Weather and pests can make summer squash a frustrating crop for home gardeners

by Sharon Dowdy, University of Georgia

Pests and diseases make summer squash one of the most challenging vegetables to grow in Georgia home gardens, according to University of Georgia plant pathologist Elizabeth Little, who studies plant diseases and control methods at the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.

“Through my plant pathology experience and observations, I’ve noticed what is most difficult to grow in Georgia’s hot, muggy summers. Squash tops the list,” Little said. “That’s why summer squash will grow better where summer conditions are cooler and drier.” Continue reading

Floating rig battles invasive lake vegetation

In StarNews Online

by Terry Reilly

The lakes at Boiling Spring Lakes are not bubbling with scalding water. Instead of steam rising, the tentacles of invasive vegetation protrude from the city’s three main lakes.

The city launched a partial attack last year but retreated due to a lack of funds. Continue reading

New Texas A&M AgriLife facility trains pest control pros

by Gabe Saldana, Texas A&M AgriLife

A new training facility for pest management professionals has opened its doors at the Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center, Dallas, where entomologists converted a graduate student dormitory into what they now call “ground zero for pest control training in Texas.”

The facility is called IPM Experience House after the science-based approach to pest control known as integrated pest management. Continue reading

APHIS Seeks Comments on Draft Pest Risk Assessment for Potato Tubers for Consumption from the United Kingdom

The government of the United Kingdom has asked USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) to authorize the importation of potato tubers for consumption into the continental United States.  APHIS has drafted a pest risk assessment that lists potential pests likely to remain on the commodity upon importation if no mitigations are applied.

APHIS shares draft pest risk assessments to determine whether stakeholders have information that might lead us to revise the draft assessment before we identify pest mitigations and proceed with official rulemaking. Continue reading