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  • Funded by USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture

    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
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European study shows various results with neonic-honey bee interactions

A study in Europe that tested bee health in neonicotinoid treated fields had different results in two countries, supporting previous statements that bee declines are the result of multiple factors.

The study, which was the largest field study ever conducted on bees and neonics, was featured in Science this past week. Scientists monitored bees in 33 locations in the United Kingdom, Germany and Hungary. Bees in each location were in canola fields, some of which had been treated with neonics and fungicides and others that were treated only with fungicides. Continue reading

Please help with school nurse online survey

The Northeast School IPM Working Group has received a grant to provide school nurses throughout the 12 northeastern states and DC with tools, information and training designed to aid in prevention and management of health-risk pests on school properties. This project is endorsed by the National Association of School Nurses. Please forward the message below to your school nurses inviting them to complete a brief survey about pest issues and concerns. The results of the survey will be used to ensure that resulting materials and information are relevant and helpful to you and your schools. If you have any questions please contact the project coordinator, Dr. Kathy Murray at kathy.murray@maine.gov or 207-287-7616. Complete the survey by clicking here or by pasting this URL into your browser: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PZVGDBF. Thank you so much! Continue reading

Establishment of more invasive species a concern for UGA experts

By Sharon Dowdy, Clint Thompson, University of Georgia

Over the next 10 years, the number of cargo containers operating out of the Port of Savannah, Georgia, is expected to double. While additional cargo means increased revenue for the state, Chuck Bargeron, associate director of the University of Georgia Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health, is concerned it could also lead to the establishment of more invasive species.

The center has identified more than 2,900 different species of wildlife, plants and insects that are present in, but not native to, North America. Many of those species come from Asia, where the ships that deliver cargo to the Port of Savannah originate. Continue reading

Phragmites scale attacking Louisiana Roseau cane

In Delta Farm Press

A team of 16 scientists and students led by the LSU AgCenter conducted a survey on May 31 to collect samples of a small insect that’s a potential threat to the fragile marsh of lower Plaquemines Parish, La.

The tiny insect, the Phragmites scale, is attacking Roseau cane, a plant similar to bamboo with a dense network of roots that hold marsh soil together. Continue reading