Woodland management is focus of UK forestry extension short course

by Carol Lea Spence, University of Kentucky

Kentucky forests are becoming fragmented, and landowners’ objectives are changing. Woodland owners who are wondering how to get the most from their property can benefit from attending one of three short courses being offered around the state this summer by the University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service.

Kentucky boasts nearly 12.5 million acres of forests. More than 300,000 families and individuals own fewer than 10 acres. Well-managed forests can provide extra income and recreational opportunities for their owners, as well as a beneficial environment for wildlife. The 2017 Woodland Owners Short Course will cover all those aspects for both novice and experienced landowners.
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UGA’s new fruit pathologist to focus on disease management of perennial fruit crops

by Clint Thompson, University of Georgia

Jonathan Oliver’s study of blueberries and his homegrown knowledge of citrus makes the Palatka, Florida, native a valuable addition to the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.

Stationed on the UGA Tifton campus, Oliver recently joined the college as a fruit pathologist specializing in blueberries, blackberries, citrus, pomegranates, olives and mayhaws. Continue reading

Update on Zika

In Southwest Farm Press

Our world is a place full of risk and danger. Every day we hear about numerous threats life and health.

Yet each morning most of us drink our coffee, crank up our engines and hit the road. After all, we must survive, and we carefully throw up barriers to keep us from dwelling on the negatives of life. Continue reading

Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education (SARE) Regional Host Institution

The purpose of the Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education program is to encourage research and outreach designed to increase knowledge concerning agricultural production systems that:

  1. maintain and enhance the quality and productivity of the soil;
  2. conserve soil, water, energy, natural resources, and fish and wildlife habitat;
  3. maintain and enhance the quality of surface and ground water;
  4. protect the health and safety of persons involved in the food and farm system;
  5. promote the well-being of animals; and
  6. increase employment opportunities in agriculture (7 U.S.C. 5801 and 5811).

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Insect scouting tips for soybean growers

In Southeast Farm Press

by Katie Nichols

For growers working to save soybean crops in the field, Alabama Cooperative Extension System entomologist Dr. Tim Reed has some insect scouting tips.

Cutworms
Cutworms are large, greasy worms that may be difficult to see. These insects burrow into the soil during the day and come to the surface to feed at night. These worms can hide underneath the residue between rows—especially in cover crop residues. Continue reading