Exotic Forest Pest Educator Position Available Immediately

Purdue University’s Department of Entomology is seeking a creative individual to serve as Exotic Forest Pest Educator.  This individual will develop Indiana’s Forest Pest Outreach Survey & Program to educate citizen scientists about invasive species and how to report them.

Requirements include a Bachelor’s degree in Entomology, Forest Entomology, Urban Forestry, Horticulture, Wildlife, Environmental Science and Technology, Technical Writing, Speech Communication or related field; and at least two years’ experience working with invasive species, the horticultural industry, pests of forests or trees, or in some field of technical mass media communication.  Continue reading

2017 All Bugs Good and Bad Webinar Series: Drain Flies, House Flies, and Fungus Gnats

August 4, 2017, 1:00 PM CDT

Insect pests marching around our homes can be puzzling to manage.   Especially frustrating is trying to figure out where they are coming from, and their life cycle.  In this webinar, Elizabeth “Wizzie” Brown, IPM Program Specialist, Texas A & M Agrilife Extension will discuss practical tips that homeowners can use to identify and help control the problem pest.   Moderated by Hunter McBrayer and Taylor Vandiver, Regional Extension Agents, Alabama Cooperative Extension System. Click here to login as a guest and participate in the live event.

Note: on August 4, the link to the live webinar opens about 15 minutes before the webinar. If you try to log in earlier, you will get an error message. 

For more webinars in this series, see 2017 All Bugs Good and Bad Webinar Series. The webinars are brought to you by the following eXtension Communities of Practice: Ant Pests, and Urban IPM; and by the Alabama Cooperative Extension System, the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service, Clemson Cooperative Extension and University of Georgia Extension.

 

Honey bee populations begin to improve

by Alan Bjerga, Bloomberg

The number of U.S. honeybees, a critical component to agricultural production, rose in 2017 from a year earlier, and deaths of the insects attributed to a mysterious malady that’s affected hives in North America and Europe declined, according a U.S. Department of Agriculture honeybee health survey released Tuesday.

The number of commercial U.S. honeybee colonies rose 3% to 2.89 million as of April 1, 2017, compared with a year earlier, the Agriculture Department reported. The number of hives lost to Colony Collapse Disorder, a phenomenon of disappearing bees that has raised concerns among farmers and scientists for a decade, was 84,430 in this year’s first quarter, down 27% from a year earlier. Year-over-year losses declined by the same percentage in April through June, the most recent data in the survey. Continue reading