IPM specialist receives national entomology honor

by Katie Pratt, University of Kentucky

The Entomological Society of America recently named Reddy Palli of the University of Kentucky the 2017 recipient of the Nan-Yao Su Award for Innovation and Creativity in Entomology.

This award was created by an endowment from Nan-Yao Su to recognize creative entomologists who have found alternative solutions to problems that significantly impact entomology. Continue reading

Graduate Student Assistantship – University of Georgia

Position: The Department of Entomology at University of Georgia is looking for a Ph.D. student to study insect-plant interactions in the turfgrass system. This position provides an exciting research opportunity for hands-on experience in learning various integrated pest management (IPM) tactics such as host plant resistance, chemical and biological control in laboratory, greenhouse and field settings. The student will have access to all the research facilities in the campuses and experimental stations in Georgia.

Location: Griffin Campus Continue reading

Finding of self-medicating behavior in bees not supported in further research

In Morning Ag Clips

A new study of possible self-medicating behavior in bumble bees conducted by researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst reports that a once-promising finding was not supported by further experiments and analysis.

Doctoral candidate Evan Palmer-Young and his advisor, evolutionary ecologist Lynn Adler, had reported in 2015 that a common parasitic infection of bumble bees was reduced when the bees fed on anabasine in sugar water. Anabasine is a natural alkaloid, nicotine-like chemical found in plant nectar. The researchers had hoped their finding was evidence that bees may use “nature’s medicine cabinet” to rid themselves of the intestinal parasite Crithidia bombi, which can decrease the survival of queen bees over the winter and hamper the success of young colonies in the spring. Continue reading

Insect threats after a flood

In Insects in the City

Many in our pest control industry find themselves in the midst of the devastating floods hitting much of south and east Texas this week.  If so, it may be a good time to remind ourselves of some unique pest challenges associated with high water.

Flooding brings all sorts of wildlife into unusually close contact with people, but few critters are more dangerous than fire ants. When floods occur, fire ants exit the ground and float, instinctively linking their legs and forming a floating mat which is nearly impossible to sink. When they inevitably bump into a dry object like a tree, a boat or a person, the ant mass “explodes” with ants quickly exiting the mass and swarming the object. Continue reading