IPM is good but gets a bad rap

I love it when another writer does my job for me–defining integrated pest management in the broad scheme of agriculture and analyzing why the general public still has trouble with the concept. In her essay in The New Food Economy, writer Sophia Mendelson discusses what IPM is, suggests that it should be called integrated crop management and muses about why the general public suddenly jumped on the organic bandwagon in 1990.

Read the article.

UC Davis is recruiting for an Assistant Professor of Urban Horticulture

The Department of Plant Sciences at UC Davis is recruiting for an Assistant Professor of Urban Horticulture.

This is a tenure track position with a focus on applying fundamental plant biological, crop physiological or ecological concepts in the context of urban ecosystem functioning.  Areas of research could include, but are not limited to environmental horticulture, urban agriculture, indoor food production, precision application of water and nutrients, the use of plants in sustainable green design, or ecological restoration of polluted lands. Continue reading

USDA’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture Announces Support for Tribal Extension and Research Programs

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) today announced grants to fund programs that promote learning, opportunity, and health within the American Indian community. The funding is made possible through two NIFA programs: the Federally-Recognized Tribes Extension Program and the Tribal Colleges Research Grants Program.

“1994 land-grant institutions are an important part of our educational and innovation system that underpins our nation’s food, agricultural, and natural resources enterprise,” said NIFA Director Sonny Ramaswamy. “These grants support educators and extension specialists who engage with tribal communities by providing education and research-based knowledge.”  Continue reading

APHIS Publishes Final Rule to Allow the Importation of Fresh Mango Fruit from Vietnam into the Continental United States

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) is amending its regulations to allow the importation of fresh mango fruit from Vietnam into the continental United States.  After analyzing the potential plant pest risks, APHIS scientists determined that mangos from Vietnam can be safely imported under a systems approach.    Continue reading