Reduced Residue Chemistry Data Requirements for Seed-Treatment Uses

EPA, in collaboration with the Health Canada Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA), analyzed seed-treatment residue data that have been submitted to EPA and PMRA. The analysis showed that the data required to support registration could be substantially reduced and still be protective of human health.

EPA is publishing new guidance, including a tiered approach to help manufacturers and EPA determine when the number of field trials can be reduced to register seed treatment uses. EPA created two decision trees detailing the processes: one for potato seed treatments only and another one for all remaining crops. A case study supported the reduction in field trials and demonstrated how the seed-treatment decision trees would affect the ultimate Based on the decision trees, both manufacturers and the agency can potentially save considerable resources in terms of conducting, submitting, and reviewing the studies while still obtaining the data necessary to support seed-treatment pesticide registrations. Continue reading

International IPM Symposium – Opening Keynote Speaker Announced

Human health pests like ticks, cockroaches and bed bugs will prominently be featured during the 9th International Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Symposium, March 19-22, 2018 at the Renaissance Baltimore Harborplace Hotel in Baltimore, Maryland USA. Those who register by February 19 will pay a reduced price.

Opening Keynote Speaker

Dr. Dini M. Miller, internationally recognized expert in the area of urban pest management, opens the symposium with a keynote address on Monday, March 19 at 5:00 PM. Miller specializes in bed bug and German cockroach biology, behavior, and control and is Professor, Virginia Tech University, and Urban Pest Management Specialist, State of Virginia. Continue reading

You should kiss and tell about this: Kissing bugs and Chagas disease webinar

Join the Environmental Protection Agency to learn about the Triatominae – commonly known as kissing, conenose, or assassin bugs – that transmit the parasite that causes Chagas disease in humans. These bugs feed on blood during the night and are called kissing bugs because they prefer to bite humans around the mouth or eyes. Loyola University’s Dr. Patricia Dorn and University of Arizona Department of Medicine’s Dr. Stephen Klotz will describe kissing bugs, Chagas disease, their importance in the U.S., and the steps you can take to prevent being bitten. Your participation will bring you up-to-date on the latest research and strategies to protect yourself from kissing bugs and Chagas disease. Continue reading