Experts: Use safe practices when processing, cooking feral hogs

by Blair Fannin, Texas A&M AgriLife

With a proliferation of feral hogs in Texas, control measures such as trapping and hunting can yield the rewards of good table fare. However, feral hogs can carry  parasites, such as hookworms, and experts advise to use safe cooking practices before consuming the meat.

“Feral hogs are destructive in nature and their daily patterns include both feeding and fighting,” said Dr. Tom Hairgrove, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service specialist in College Station. “They fight off other feral hogs in their daily activities of searching for food and can incur lesions or open wounds. This may create openings for parasites and lead to infections, discoloring the meat, etc. That’s why it’s good for those who process feral hogs to be on the lookout for any abnormalities and use safe practices when processing the meat.” Continue reading

Redesigned website provides farmers with useful information

With the growing season just around the corner, farmers and agribusinesses have a new tool to help them tackle crop management challenges in the Crop Protection Network’s redesigned website.

The website http://www.cropprotectionnetwork.org features timely videos, newsletter and blog articles, featured articles and Twitter updates from CPN partners on important management issues for a variety of field crops as well as the network’s corn and soybean publications. The website also includes an encyclopedia of crop diseases to help farmers identify diseases in their fields using extensive image galleries and keywords to filter results. Continue reading

Cover crop choices must be well-planned

In Delta Farm Press

Producers who plant winter crops with no intention of harvesting them reap the benefits of soil conservation, weed control and nutrient retention.

On the flip side, however, the practice of almost constant production in a field creates issues with pest management. Farmers who “plant green” have to balance these challenges to best prepare the way for good crops each year. Continue reading

It’s not a disease (or is it?): managing tree and forest health in palms, pines, and more

This webinar will cover new and emerging diseases in tree species ranging from palms to pines. The webinar will also discuss some issues that appear as diseases, but are caused by abiotic or human factors (including pesticide damage). Sponsored by the Southern Regional Extension Forestry.

Date and Time: February 21, 2018 at 1 PM ET

Speaker: Carrie Harmon, Southern Plant Diagnostic Network

Continue reading