It’s not a disease (or is it?): managing tree and forest health in palms, pines, and more

This webinar will cover new and emerging diseases in tree species ranging from palms to pines. The webinar will also discuss some issues that appear as diseases, but are caused by abiotic or human factors (including pesticide damage). Sponsored by the Southern Regional Extension Forestry.

Date and Time: February 21, 2018 at 1 PM ET

Speaker: Carrie Harmon, Southern Plant Diagnostic Network

Trees in the southeastern U.S. are under constant threat from diseases, both invasive/exotic and native to the area.  This webinar will cover biology and management of several diseases impacting trees in urban and rural areas.  Palm decline, diplodia tip blight and pitch canker on southern pines, and other emerging diseases will be discussed in terms of how they spread, the damage they do, and what can be done to manage the disease once it’s found.  Herbicide damage often has similar symptoms to diseases, and in particular metsulfuron damage to oaks has greatly increased recently across the southern states.  This webinar will discuss how to diagnose this damage, and what can be done to mitigate it once it’s happened.

Learn more and register for the webinar.

**If this is the first webinar you have attended through forestrywebinars.net, it is highly recommended that you begin the process of getting your computer set up at least 20 minutes prior to the webinar start time to ensure everything is in proper working order**

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