What gardeners should know about organic insecticides!

by Ayanava Majumdar, Alabama Cooperative Extension Service

Organic insecticides are critical tools to insect control, especially in the hot and humid south where insect pests never seem to rest. Even in the dead of winter, insect pests such as the yellowmargined leaf beetles can be active in the soil on a warm winter day (just look under some turnip plants and other host plants for deep brown larvae that may be in the ground). In most cases, vegetable plants have should be protected early in the season with a variety of integrated pest management tactics. Insecticides are the last resort for pest management in a sustainable system. With latest advances in IPM technologies, there are several types of organic insecticides to choose from, namely, physical desiccants, contact and stomach poisons, and products with volatile action. Below is a brief description of modes of action and usage tips. Continue reading

New AgriLife Extension statewide cotton pest management guide is now available

by Steve Byrnes, Texas A&M AgriLife

Entomologists with the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service have just released a new statewide guide on managing cotton insect pests, said one of its authors.

Dr. Suhas Vyavhare, AgriLife Extension cotton entomologist at Lubbock, said The Cotton Insect Management Guide can be accessed online at http://bit.ly/2GZi5sI or can be downloaded free from the AgriLife Extension bookstore at  http://bit.ly/2nToDAw . Continue reading

University of Florida doctoral student wins award for work with spotted wing drosophila

Although it is no longer a new pest, spotted wing drosophila continues to be a bane for small fruit—especially organic—growers. To help both organic and conventional growers fight the pest, a University of Florida doctoral student examined several pest management options and has won a regional award for her research.

Lindsy Iglesias

Lindsy Iglesias, who will graduate from the University of Florida in May with her Ph.D., discovered some novel and more efficient ways to scout and control spotted wing drosophila, or SWD, that will work for both organic and conventional growers. She won a Friends of Southern IPM Graduate Student Award from the Southern IPM Center for her work. Continue reading

UGA Extension fruit pathologist says use lime sulfur on blueberries to manage Exobasidium disease

By Clint Thompson, University of Georgia

The key to managing Exobasidium leaf and fruit spot disease in blueberries, which makes the fruit unmarketable, is one application of lime sulfur approximately two weeks prior to bud break, according to Jonathan Oliver, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension fruit pathologist.

Exobasidium disease causes spots on the leaves and fruit, decreases the fruit’s size and, because of the fruit’s immaturity, gives it a bitter taste. The leaf spots eventually turn velvety and white and lead to early defoliation, and the spotted fruit is not fit for sale. Continue reading

2018 Southern Dairy Conference, March 5-7 in Nashville

Please consider attending and help spread the word about the 2018 Southern Dairy Conference.  The Southern Dairy Conference is a prime event to learn about issues impacting the southern dairy industry as well as methodologies to overcome them for our southern producers.  This event, organized and hosted by researchers, extension specialists, and university educators from multiple southern institutions, brings together the best and brightest for meaningful presentations, panel discussions, and networking opportunities.  

Where: Nashville, TN

When: March 5-7, 2018

Please find more information at the link below. 

http://blog.extension.uga.edu/dairy/2018/02/southern-dairy-conference/