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USDA Provides Almost $70 Million in Fiscal Year 2018 to Protect Agriculture and Plants from Pests and Diseases through the 2014 Farm Bill Section 10007

U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Under Secretary for Marketing and Regulatory Programs Greg Ibach has announced that the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is allocating almost $70 million from Section 10007 of the 2014 Farm Bill to support 494 projects in 49 states, Guam and Puerto Rico. These projects prevent the introduction or spread of invasive plant pests and diseases that threaten U.S. agriculture and the environment, as well as ensure the availability of a healthy supply of clean plant stock in the United States.

“Through the Farm Bill Section 10007, the USDA strengthens our nation’s ability to safeguard U.S. specialty crops, agriculture, and natural resources by putting innovative ideas into action,” said Under Secretary Ibach. “Getting these funds into the hands of our cooperators around the country helps us to keep U.S. plants, crops, and forests safe from invasive pests and diseases, enhances the marketability of our country’s products, and makes American agriculture and natural resources thrive.” Continue reading

UGA Extension study shows impact of herbicides on pecan trees

By Clint Thompson, University of Georgia

Dicamba and 2,4-D herbicides, sprayed directly on trees at full rates, kill the plant material they touch, but they don’t travel through the tree or linger from year to year, according to a newly released University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan study. The study also found that drift from the herbicides does not hurt the trees.

UGA Extension pecan specialist Lenny Wells and UGA Extension weed scientist Eric Prostko researched the effects of low and high concentrations of dicamba and 2,4-D herbicides on pecan trees at the university’s Ponder Farm in Tifton, Georgia. They studied 5-, 8- and 9-year-old ‘Desirable’ pecan trees. No data was collected on older trees. Continue reading

EPA Announces Draft Pesticide Label Revisions on Respirators to Ensure Consistency between EPA and NIOSH

EPA is requesting public comment on revised respirator descriptions for pesticide labels.

EPA is making these revisions, with the encouragement of state regulatory agencies, as part of our efforts to:

  • Bring the respirator descriptions on pesticide labels into conformance with the current National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) respirator language;
  • Ensure that pesticide handlers and their employers have the information they need to identify and buy the respirator required to provide needed protection;
  • Delete outdated statements referring to respirators that no longer exist; and
  • Clarify and update language to ensure easy compliance with the guidance.

Continue reading

Webinar: Glyphosate, Friend or Foe?

Join the National Association of Exotic Pest Plant Councils for a webinar on Apr 18, 2018 at 3:00 PM EDT.

Register now! Continue reading

UGA Forestry Position Announcement – Assistant Professor – Outreach/Extension Silviculture

The Assistant Professor position in the UGA Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources focused on Outreach/Extension Silviculture is to be located in Tifton, Georgia.  

POSITION AND RESPONSIBILITIES: This is a fiscal year (12-month, 1.0 EFT) tenure-track, 75% outreach and 25% research appointment offered at the rank of Assistant Professor and is stationed at the University of Georgia Campus in Tifton, GA. Individuals with expertise in the broad area of silvicultural issues relevant to southern ecosystems are encouraged to apply. Responsibilities will include the development of externally funded applied research and outreach/extension programs that produce relevant, refereed literature and science-based information. The focus area will be in vegetation management, including native and invasive plants, use of prescribed burning, establishment and management of southern pine stands or related topics to the state and region. The successful candidate is expected to establish a regionally/nationally recognized program in applied silviculture. The successful candidate will be expected to obtain external funding, publish research findings in the peer-reviewed scientific literature and widely disseminated extension literature, direct/mentor graduate students, collaborate with faculty and stakeholders, serve on School/University committees, and actively participate in professional /scientific societies. Continue reading

Farmers.gov highlights producers, latest information

Last month, U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue unveiled Farmers.gov, the new interactive one-stop website for producers maintained by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). Farmers.gov is now live and will have multiple features added over the coming months to allow agricultural producers to make appointments with USDA offices, file forms, and apply for USDA programs. The website gathers together the three agencies that comprise USDA’s Farm Production and Conservation (FPAC) mission area: the Farm Service Agency, the Natural Resources Conservation Service, and the Risk Management Agency.

This month, the website launched its blog, which features stories from all three agencies including articles on crop insurance. Monday they kicked-off a special blog feature called Fridays on the Farm (#FOTF):

Rural Health and Safety Education Competitive Grants Program (RHSE)

The RHSE program proposals are expected to be community-based, outreach education programs, such as those conducted through Human Science extension outreach, that provides individuals and families with: Information as to the value of good health at any age; Information to increase individual or family’s motivation to take more responsibility for their own health; Information regarding rural environmental health issues that directly impact on human health; Information about and access to health promotion and educational activities; and Training for volunteers and health services providers concerning health promotion and health care services for individuals and families in cooperation with state, local and community partners. Continue reading