Invasive Plant Internships in Asheville, NC

American Conservation Experience, a Non-Profit Conservation Corps based in Flagstaff, AZ, in partnership with the National Park Service, is seeking TWO Natural Resource Management Interns to dedicate 26 weeks in support of the NPS Southeast Exotic Plant Management Team (SE-EPMT). The purpose of the SE-EPMT is to provide support to partner parks in the management, control, and eradication of invasive, exotic plants and forest pathogens.

These opportunities are intended for conscientious, enthusiastic, individuals with a background in any aspect of natural resource management. Individuals applying for these positions should be aware these positions involve extensive travel within the southeastern US and often strenuous physical field labor. Continue reading

UGA CAES team researching whiteflies statewide

By Clint Thompson, University of Georgia

Silverleaf whiteflies devastated Georgia’s cotton and fall vegetable crops last year. In response to this crisis, a team of University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences research and UGA Cooperative Extension specialists is studying the pests statewide to help cotton and vegetable farmers avoid another year of disappointing crops.

“Teams are an important part of UGA. Many of the issues agriculturists face today require a collection of scientists from differing disciplines with differing expertise to address complex issues. The silverleaf whitefly fits the bill here,” said Phillip Roberts, UGA Extension cotton and soybean entomologist and Whitefly Team member. “Not only are whiteflies a direct pest of plants as a result of feeding, but they also transmit several viruses to vegetables that can have a devastating effect on virus-susceptible crops.” Continue reading

Tips for dealing with carpenter bees

By Wade Hutcheson, University of Georgia

We used to try to hit them with baseball bats. A tennis racket would have been a better choice, but there were no tennis courts on our farm.

We would also catch them going into their holes, plug the hole and listen to their angry reply. Carpenter bees were a lot of fun for growing boys. Continue reading