APHIS Updates Regulated Areas in Miami-Dade County for Giant African Snail (Lissachatina fulica, formerly Achatina fulica)

Effective July 24, 2018, the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) removed giant African snail (GAS) regulated areas Zone F, Zone S, and Zone V from the list of quarantined areas in Miami-Dade County, Florida. APHIS and the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS) collaborated to develop the protocol for removing areas from quarantine. Under the protocol, FDACS and APHIS use the following criteria to deregulate a quarantined area/zone:

  • Surveillance and treatment efforts for 17 months with no detection of live GAS;
  • An additional 19 months of surveillance with no detection of live GAS;
  • A minimum of one negative detector dog survey; and
  • A minimum of one negative night survey, when snails can be more active.

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Texas entomologists warn residents about new tick species

by Steve Byrnes, Texas A&M AgriLife University

Confirmed reports of the longhorned tick, Haemaphysalis longicornis, in six states have prompted a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service entomologist to alert Texans to its possible arrival.

Dr. Sonja Swiger, AgriLife Extension veterinary/medical entomologist at Stephenville, said the longhorned tick isn’t named for the iconic bovine symbol of the Lone Star State, but rather for the distinctive, but underrated “horns” sprouting from a portion of its head. Continue reading

Last day for project suggestions is August 17

Cooperators who wish to submit project suggestions for fiscal year (FY) 2019 funding consideration under the Plant Pest and Disease Management and Disaster Prevention Program (PPDMDPP) should do so no later than midnight Hawaii Standard Time/6:00 a.m. Eastern Daylight Savings Time on August 18.  Continue reading

Post Doc Position – Invasive Insects Modeling at Oregon State University

The Integrated Plant Protection Center (IPPC) invites applications for a full-time (1.0 FTE), 12-month, fixed-term Research Associate (Post Doc) position. Reappointment is at the discretion of the Director.

Integrated Plant Protection Center (IPPC) helps farmers adapt to an increasingly uncertain world through high impact science and education partnerships. IPPC works regionally, nationally, and internationally in education regarding pesticide safety, pesticide risk management, weather based decision tools, and pollinator protection. Continue reading

Register for the Sept. 12th Part 15 Public Hearing on FDA’s Predictive Toxicology Roadmap

FDA is holding a public hearing on Wed., Sept. 12 to get feedback from stakeholders on the Agency’s six-part Predictive Toxicology Roadmap for integrating cutting-edge predictive toxicology methods into safety and risk assessments of its products. Among other recommendations, the roadmap calls for FDA research to identify data gaps to support intramural and extramural research to ensure that the most promising technologies are developed, validated, and integrated into the product pipeline.

Wednesday, September 12, 2018

9 a.m. to 4 p.m. EST

Register here by Wed., August 29, 2018 for webcast and in-person attendance. Continue reading

UK researcher receives $1.25 million grant to study corn anthracnose

By Katie Pratt, University of Kentucky

Anthracnose stalk rot is a fungal disease of corn that can cause lodging and completely destroy a crop. It is ranked among the top three diseases that cause yield losses in corn each year. Lisa Vaillancourt, a University of Kentucky plant pathologist, has studied this disease for several years and is working toward a management solution.

Recently, Vaillancourt received a $1.25 million grant from the Plant Biotic Interactions Program, a joint venture between the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the National Science Foundation. The goal of the grant is to further examine an anthracnose mutant produced in her lab that is unable to cause the stalk rot disease in corn plants. Continue reading

Research assistantship working with saproxylic insects in southeastern U.S. forests

Position description and background:

The Entomology Department at the University of Georgia is looking for a PhD student (research assistantship) to work on projects addressing the diversity, ecology and conservation of saproxylic insects (those that depend on dying or dead wood) in the southeastern United States. Saproxylic insects account for at least one fifth of forest insect biodiversity, provide many important ecosystem services, and are sensitive to activities that reduce the abundance and variety of dead wood in forests. This position represents an opportunity to address some major knowledge gaps concerning this group in North America. Focal areas for this research include, but are not limited to, the following: Continue reading