iPiPE Newsletter

– Submitted by Kathryn Kimble Day, NIFA

iPiPE is a set of online tools, information products and expert commentary for the detection and management of pests that threaten US crops. By enabling sharing about pest observations and other data, iPiPE builds local and regional capacity to manage crop pests, reducing unnecessary pesticide applications, enhancing farm profitability and contributing to national food security.

A free monthly newsletter is now available to connect people involved in pest management with tools to help them. The newsletter shares updates from iPiPE participants including Extension staff around the country and their student interns, and is for those already involved with iPiPE as well as newcomers. Updates highlight how Extension programs are using the iPiPE infrastructure to communicate actionable pest management information to growers in their region. The January newsletter highlights the Mid Atlantic tree fruit crop-pest program and how they are using iPiPE to improve monitoring of new and invasive pests like spotted lanternfly and brown marmorated stinkbug and communicate time-sensitive information to growers to precisely time insecticide applications.

Sign up for the mailing list by filling out the subscription form here: http://eepurl.com/dz2XCr

Ariel Larson

Project Manager, Sustainable Food Group

IPM Institute of North America, Inc

211 S. Paterson Street Suite 380

Madison, WI 53703

(608) 232-1410 x1010

2019 Monarch Conservation Webinar Series

monarch

We are excited to announce the topics for the 2019 Monarch Conservation Webinar Series! The Monarch Joint Venture is partnering with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center to put on another year full of informative and inspiring webinars on all things monarch.

Starting in February, webinars will be held live on the 4th Tuesday of the month at 2 PM Eastern Time. (Plus a bonus webinar in March!) The November and December dates have been moved to avoid conflicting with major holidays. Each webinar will be recorded and available here for later viewing as well.

Check out the webinar titles and dates below, and click on a title to register!

Please note this list is subject to change. Our events page will have the most up to date information on our webinar series, as well as a calendar of additional monarch-related events. Find it here.

We look forward to sharing this great series with you! Thank you for joining us.

Chemical Component of IPM Gets the Spotlight during National Pesticide Safety Education Month

The second annual National Pesticide Safety Education Month gets underway February 1st, to reinforce core principles of safe handling and use and to raise awareness of and support for the land-grant university Pesticide Safety Education Programs (PSEPs). Pesticide safety is an absolute requirement when using the chemical component of Integrated Pest Management (IPM).

“IPM considers the variety of pest management methods and teaches how to properly manage pests, whether the approach contains chemicals or not,” says Cecil Tharp, Montana State University PSEP. “A vital role of PSEPs in teaching IPM is to pass along the message that it is not solely pesticides that should be used to deal with pests,” adds Jon Johnson, Penn State University PSEP.

“We take all the IPM strategies and do a lot of planning to prevent pests. If there is an unacceptable pest infestation at some point, pesticides may be required and their safe use is essential,” explains Lisa Blecker, University of California PSEP. “The IPM process has the key role in helping applicators understand all the available tools and make appropriate decisions to control the pest,” notes Clyde Ogg, University of Nebraska PSEP. “That includes being as smart as we can in the use of pesticides,” adds Gene Merkl, Mississippi State University PSEP.

“While PSEPs are often focused on teaching the safe use of pesticides, pesticides are only one possible choice in the IPM toolbox and not always the best choice,” says Mimi Rose, Ohio State University PSEP. “Even if the applicator chooses to use a pesticide, there are other pest management practices that must also be followed to successfully manage the pest.” Don Renchie, Texas A&M PSEP, summarizes the big picture – “When everyone understands the importance of IPM strategies and other best management practices, it avoids problems for the general public and the environment, and for pesticide applicators. With or without pesticides, protecting human health and the environment is always the goal.”

Visit the National Pesticide Safety Education Month webpage to review basic pesticide safety principles and much more. Everyone is invited to share the link with others and use the educational resources, self-assessment and quiz to promote safe use of pesticides, whenever pesticides are used.

-Submitted by Carol Somody, Syngenta