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  • Funded by USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture

    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
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Crop Protection and Pest Management Funding Opportunity

NIFA Update Banner

Crop Protection and Pest Management (CPPM)

The purpose of the Crop Protection and Pest Management program is to address high priority issues related to pests and their management using IPM approaches at the state, regional and national levels. The CPPM program supports projects that will ensure food security and respond effectively to other major societal pest management challenges with comprehensive IPM approaches that are economically viable, ecologically prudent, and safe for human health. The CPPM program addresses IPM challenges for emerging issues and existing priority pest concerns that can be addressed more effectively with new and emerging technologies. The outcomes of the CPPM program are effective, affordable, and environmentally sound IPM practices and strategies needed to maintain agricultural productivity and healthy communities.

Who is eligible to apply:

1862 Land-Grant Institutions, 1890 Land-Grant Institutions, 1994 Land-Grant Institutions, Hispanic-Serving Institutions, Other or Additional Information (See below), Private Institutions of Higher Ed, State Controlled Institutions of Higher Ed

More on Eligibility:

Applications may only be submitted by colleges and universities (as defined in section 1404 of NARETPA) (7 U.S.C. 3103) to the CPPM program. Section 1404 of NARETPA was amended by section 7101 of the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 (FCEA) to define Hispanic-serving Agricultural Colleges and Universities (HSACUs), and to include research foundations maintained by eligible colleges or universities. Section 406(b) of AREERA (7 U.S.C. 7626), was amended by section 7206 of the Farm Security and Rural Investment Act of 2002 to add the 1994 Land-Grant Institutions as eligible to apply for grants under this authority. Award recipients may subcontract to organizations not eligible to apply provided such organizations are necessary for the conduct of the project. Failure to meet an eligibility criterion by the application deadline may result in the application being excluded from consideration or, even though an application may be reviewed, will preclude NIFA from making an award.

Request for Applications

Apply for Grant

Posted Date: Friday, February 15, 2019

Closing Date: Tuesday, April 16, 2019

Funding Opportunity Number: USDA-NIFA-CPPM-006536

Estimated Total Program Funding: $4,000,000

 

Current EPA Review of Captan

Captan, a common fungicide used in strawberry, apple, peach and the caneberry industries is currently under EPA review. For those of you who use Captan for fruit/commodity production, please respond to the EPA’s call for comments by March 15, 2019.

Comments can be made at https://www.regulations.gov/docket?D=EPA-HQ-OPP-2013-0296

Written by Ryan Adams: https://ipm.ces.ncsu.edu/2019/02/current-epa-review-of-captan/

WEBINAR: Accelerating the Landscape Transformation

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) WaterSense® program and the Alliance for Water Efficiency invite you to join a free webinar, Accelerating the Landscape Transformation [watersense.c.goolara.net], on Thursday, February 28, 2019, at 2:00 p.m. EasternRegistration through browsers such as Chrome or Firefox is recommended.

Mary Ann Dickinson, president and CEO of the Alliance for Water Efficiency, and project team members Dr. Thomas Chesnutt (A&N Technical Services, Inc.) and Maureen Erbeznik (Maureen Erbeznik & Associates), will give a presentation on the Alliance’s forthcoming Landscape Transformation study. The study is the first research product of AWE’s Outdoor Water Savings Research Initiative and is the most expansive and diverse assessment of utility outdoor programs to date. The team will share findings from an impact analysis of utility program data from municipalities in the United States and Canada, as well as a process evaluation consisting of customer surveys, interviews, and market analysis

Following the webinar, upon request, WaterSense can provide proof of attendance for attendees who joined the webinar for at least 30 minutes. This webinar is open to the public, so please feel free to share this invitation with other networks or interested parties. You can also watch other WaterSense/Alliance for Water Efficiency on-demand webinars [watersense.c.goolara.net] covering topics such as:

  • Reducing Outdoor Water Use With Microirrigation
  • Outdoor Water Use and Green Infrastructure
  • Using Mobile Technology to Communicate With Water Customers

If you have any questions about these webinars, please contact the WaterSense Helpline at (866) WTR-SENS (987-7367) or watersense@epa.gov.

Water for Agriculture Webinar – Feb. 19th

The multi-disciplinary Water for Agriculture project is hosting a webinar on February 19th at 1:00 p.m. ET on the Voluntary Stewardship Program. The webinar will offer an on-the-ground example of diverse interests engaging in a collaborative process to address issues around preserving agriculture while protecting natural resources like water and fish. For more information, see the attachment or visit: http://water4ag.psu.edu/events/.

This webinar is the first in the Water for Ag Engagement Webinar series, intended to encourage sharing of scholarship and practitioners’ experience with community-based stakeholder engagement in natural resources. The Water for Agriculture project brings together researchers, technical experts, Extension professionals, and communities to foster community-led solutions to the water and agriculture issues most important to them.
-Submitted by K. Devlin, NE Regional Center for Rural Development, PSU