New Resources Available for Tawny Crazy Ant Management

A working group focusing on the tawny crazy ant is developing materials to help people identify and manage this pest.

First funded in 2015, the Tawny Crazy Ant Working Group used a 2017 IPM Enhancement grant to create videos, conference booth materials and booklets with information about the ant. Continue reading

WILD SPOTTER™ – A New National Effort to Increase Citizen Science Capacity to Map Invasive Species in America’s Wild Places.

In partnership with Wildlife Forever, USDA Forest Service, and other organizations across the United States,  the University of Georgia – Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health has launched a nationwide citizen science volunteer capacity-building program called Wild Spotter.  Designed to help locate and map aquatic and terrestrial invasive species in Wilderness Areas, Wild & Scenic Rivers, and other wild places across the 193 million-acre National Forest System, this new program engages and empowers the public, local communities, states, tribes, and many other groups to help the Forest Service confront the threats from harmful exotic plants, animals, and pathogens that invade America’s beautiful and economically important wild places.  The Wild Spotter program provides the tools these volunteers need to help locate, quantify, map, and report invasive species infestations in a simple and effective manner, while raising public awareness about invasive species and promoting collaborations across the landscape.

Register for a webinar on Wild Spotter: Mapping Invasives in America’s Wild Places on Jul 26, 2018 3:00 PM EDT at:  https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8187228954700337155 Continue reading

Tick and Mosquito Conference, August 7, White Plains, NY

The New York State IPM Program, in collaboration with Cornell Cooperative Extension of Westchester County and Westchester County Parks, is hosting the 4th Annual IPM Conference. This year’s conference will explore the role of IPM in vector management, including insights from academics and practitioners. “Break the Cycle: Integrated Management of Ticks and Mosquitoes,” will take place on Tuesday, August 7th at the Westchester County Center in White Plains, NY. Continue reading

Plant sciences research projects taking shape

by Dee Shore, NC State University

Design of the Plant Sciences Building at NC State University is progressing, and so is the NC Plant Science Initiative (PSI) that the building will serve. Scientists from the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and their partners near and far are ramping up interdisciplinary plant research.

Dr. Amy Grunden, of CALS’ Department of Plant and Microbial Biology, is one of them.

Earlier this year, Grunden helped develop a workshop for faculty members at NC State and three Danish universities – the University of Copenhagen, the Danish Technical University and Aarhus University. Continue reading

NC State Makes Strides Toward Regulatory Science Center

by Dee Shore, NC State University

NC State’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences is moving closer to its goal of setting up a Center of Excellence for Regulatory Science in Agriculture, and a three-year gift from Bayer Crop Science is making a difference.

The proposed center – part of the college’s Plant Sciences Initiative – would bring together efforts at NC State related to the complex world of regulations governing agriculture and the science behind them. Continue reading

Citizen Scientists are helping air potato beetle take a bite out of a major weed pest

A citizen science program in Florida is keeping track of how successfully the air potato beetle is keeping air potato in check.

Native to Asia and sub-Saharan Africa, air potato is a member of the yam family. The plant was first identified in the U.S. back in 1777 and spread throughout the Gulf Coast region of the U.S. It is now a problem weed in Florida, Louisiana, Alabama, Mississippi, Texas, Hawaii and Puerto Rico. In both Alabama and Florida, it is listed as a noxious weed. Continue reading

New tick species discovered in North Carolina

Recent tick surveys sent to the US Department of Agriculture identified a longhorned tick on an opossum in Polk County, North Carolina. The longhorned tick is an exotic species from Asia that is a serious pest of livestock.

The tick was initially identified in New Jersey in 2017, but further research into other reported ticks that may have been misidentified have revealed that the first recorded case of this tick was on a white-tailed deer in August 2010 in West Virginia. Before its introduction in North Carolina, the tick had been positively identified in Arkansas, New Jersey, Virginia and West Virginia. Continue reading