Tune in February 27 to learn how to manage target spot

In a webinar on Monday, February 27, at 3 PM Eastern, Austin Hagan, professor and extension plant pathologist at Auburn University, will discuss ways to recognize target spot in your field as well as management techniques to lower the risk.

Target spot, which is caused by the fungus Corynespora cassiicola, is an emerging disease in cotton in the Lower and Mid-South in the U.S. Phylogenetically, C. cassiicola isolates collected from cotton across the Lower South are distinct from those collected from other crops, particularly vegetables. This suggests that C. cassiicola isolates from cotton are either a recent introduction to the U.S. or has arisen from a mutation. Rainfall patterns along with variety selection and management inputs relating to yield potential influence the target spot risk in cotton. Greatest target spot-attributed defoliation and subsequent yield losses, which may exceed 300 pounds of lint per acre, have been recorded for an intensively managed, susceptible variety having a yield potential above 2.5 to 3 bales per acre. Continue reading

Missed the Palmer amaranth webinar? Recording is in YouTube

On Wednesday, February 15, Muthu Bagavathiannan, specialist in weed ecology and agronomy, presented a new tool for consultants, extension specialists and agents, and growers to assist with management decisions regarding Palmer amaranth, named PAM. Based in Microsoft Excel, the tool allows the user to input their rotation schedule, chosen varieties and other management practices. From those entries, the tool calculates the amount of weed seed present over a 10-year period, as well as the economic gains or losses during that period. In addition, it calculates the risk of the combination of practices and allows the user to compare up to 6 different management scenarios. The tool calculates risk based on the amount of weed seed present, which has been concluded to be the main reason for pigweed-related crop failures. 

You can get to the tool from this link.

If you would like to see Dr. Bagavathiannan’s presentation, follow this link to the YouTube recording. During the 60-minute video, he demonstrates how to use the tool and how to interpret the results.

North Central Integrated Pest Management Center announces FY17 working group and critical issue grant awards

From one of our sister IPM Centers:

The North Central Integrated Pest Management Center (NCIPMC) provided funding opportunities for two grants programs in FY17 with approximately $450,000 available in funding.

The FY17 NCIPMC Critical Issues Grants Program has funded four projects identified as critical issues that will address needs of regional importance. The program is designed to provide one-time seed funding to help initiate work requiring immediate attention until other longer-term resources can be secured to address the issue. Continue reading

School IPM Roundtable meeting creates linkages, resources

by Janet Hurley, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension

On May 25, 2016, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) convened 29 representatives of 17 national school, health and pest management associations and federal government agencies in Washington, DC to discuss ideas for implementing a set of principles promoting the adoption of IPM practices in the nation’s schools. A meeting summary documents the event, captures key discussion and presentation points, and provides links to resources referenced. A blog by EPA Assistant Administrator Jim Jones, Endorsing a Path to Healthier Schools, provides context for the event and highlights its importance to the school community.

The 2016 School IPM Roundtable brought together disparate groups to pursue a voluntary enterprise that addresses pest problems proactively and reduces unnecessary exposure to pesticides.  These organizations provided their endorsement of a Principles of Agreement on school IPM.  They also committed to disseminate the endorsement, along with information on resources available to support school IPM implementation, to their members and associates. The event included an exchange of ideas on how the participants could track implementation of school IPM as a result of the endorsement. Continue reading

Tomorrow at 3 PM ET: Learn about a pigweed decision management tool

Herbicide resistance in Palmer amaranth (known as Palmer pigweed) is a serious issue in the Southern US and is spreading to several other states. Repeated use of a few herbicide mechanisms of action (MOA) without sufficient management diversity is the common cause of this resistance. A proactive resistance management strategy that integrates diverse chemical and non-chemical tools will help prevent/manage resistance and preserve the utility of available herbicide options.

This webinar provides a general overview and demonstration of a new Microsoft-Excel based decision support tool that guides informed decision making for effective management of this weed, with particular focus on soil seedbank management and profitability. Users can build their own management programs and see for themselves how effective their pigweed management program is, as well as overall economic outcomes associated with their options. This tool also predicts the likely risk of resistance for the management program built by the user.

Date and time: Wednesday, February 15, at 3 PM Eastern time Continue reading

2017 Annual Imported Fire Ant and Other Invasive Ants Conference

We are pleased to invite you to the 2017 Annual Imported Fire Ant and Other Invasive Ants Conference in Mobile, AL May 16-18, 2017.  The conference will be held at the Renaissance Mobile Riverview Plaza Hotel, 64 South Water Street, Mobile, AL 36602.

Registration is now open.  Early registration fees are $200 per person until 4:45 pm Central Time, April 14, 2017.  After that date, registration fees will be $250 per person.  Registration fees for graduate students and guests are $100 per person.  Registration will include an evening reception Tuesday, May 16, Continental Breakfast Wednesday, May 17 and Thursday, May 18, and lunch on Wednesday, May 17. Continue reading

EPA Publishes 2017 Annual Report on Chemical Risk Evaluation

The Environmental Protection Agency is meeting another requirement of the Frank R. Lautenberg Chemicals Safety for the 21 Century Act, which amended the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), by publishing an annual report on risk evaluation.  The reformed TSCA requires that EPA identify the chemical substances that will undergo risk evaluation during that year, those for which risk evaluation will be initiated and those for which risk evaluation will be completed, including status and schedules.  This report must also identify the resources necessary to complete these tasks.  Read the report

Learn more about TSCA Implementation