Graduate Student Award Winner Finds Bug Bombs Don’t Live up to Claims

Setting off a bug bomb may seem like an easy solution to a roach infestation, but research at NC State University shows that it may actually harm the homeowner more than the roaches.

Zachary DeVries, who recently began a postdoc appointment at NC State University, examined the effectiveness of total release foggers for cockroaches for his doctoral dissertation. He is this year’s recipient of a IPM Symposium Graduate Student award and a Friends of Southern IPM Graduate Student award in the Ph.D. category. Continue reading

National Invasive Species Week

February 26 through March 2 is National Invasive Species Week. Participate in events across the nation to raise awareness and identify solutions to invasive species issues at local, state, tribal, regional, international and national scales. Locate an invasive species event in your state or county. Plan your own event using the NISAW Toolkit – where and when it works for you.

Below is the schedule for activities in Washington, DC. If you plan on going to the events in DC, the organizers ask if you would participate in the Doodle Poll if you haven’t already. Continue reading

Kathy Murray wins Healthy Kids Hero award

Kathy Murray has a national reputation for dedication, expertise, and leadership. Murray is co-coordinator of the Northeastern School Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Working Group and a member of the National IPM School Steering Committee. The Northeastern Group is a regional group with representatives from land-grant IPM programs, government, private industry, and nonprofits from eleven northeastern states.

Read her whole story and why she won the award.

Want pollinators? Lower the temperature

Researchers at NC State University recently published a paper about wild bee abundance in relationship to urban warming.

The paper challenges the idea that planting more flowers will attract more pollinators. Although the number of larger bees do increase as flower populations increase, populations of small bees tend to decline at some of the hottest sites. Continue reading

IPM Enhancement Grant projects examine agricultural, urban issues

The Southern IPM Center will spend $309,653 to address agricultural and urban issues during the next year with its IPM Enhancement Grant. Out of 32 proposals submitted to the program, a review panel outside of the region selected 11 for funding.

IPM Enhancement Grants are relatively small grants (up to $30,000 for most) to address an integrated pest management issue. Most publicly funded organizations are eligible to apply as long as they reside in one of the 13 states or territories covered by the Southern IPM Center. Continue reading

International IPM Symposium – Early Registration Ends Monday, February 19

Act Now and SAVE $75. Early discounted registration ends on Monday, February 19.

The registration fee includes admission to all symposium sessions and Tick Summit, Wednesday poster session reception, three continental breakfasts, and refreshment breaks. Fees will increase after February 19. For registration information, visit 

Attendees are encouraged to stay at the symposium hotel, Renaissance Baltimore Harborplace Hotel, 202 East Pratt Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21202 USA. Make your reservations by February 19 to take advantage of the symposium rate.

Silicon amendments may provide sustainable control for rice water weevil

A Masters student at Louisiana State University is seeking a more sustainable way to manage rice water weevil, by amending soils with silicon to strengthen the plant. He is also this year’s winner of the Friends of Southern IPM Graduate Student award in the Masters category.

Rice water weevil is a tiny insect that feeds on the rice plant’s leaves as an adult. After mating, females lay their eggs at the base of the plant. Larvae feed on the roots. The larval feeding on the roots potentially interferes with the nutrient uptake, thereby, weakening the plant. Root damage can cause yield losses through decreasing panicle densities, number of grains, and grain weight. Rice growers use insecticides to control rice water weevil. Continue reading