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    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
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Plant breeding is key to sustainable farming, CommonGround says

in Southwest Farm Press

by Cathryn-Wojcicki-NCGA

For more than seven years, CommonGround volunteers have served as resources for consumers who have questions about how their food is grown. In a newly-released video http://bit.ly/2AKymxo, CommonGround Iowa volunteer Sara Ross shares her perspective on plant breeding innovation with the help of a fellow mom – and plant breeder – Jessie Alt.

“Plant breeding innovation will help us continue to be sustainable and improve on our sustainability so our sons can one day possibly step into the role of farmer on our family farm,” says Ross. Continue reading

Study finds rotating with corn boosts cotton yields

In Delta Farm Press

Cotton following corn in rotation resulted in an average 8.9 percent to 17.1 percent yield increase compared to continuous cotton in a 12-year study at Mississippi State University.

Wayne Ebelhar, MSU research professor and agronomist, discussed the long-term research project at the recent Beltwide Cotton Conferences in San Antonio. The study was conducted on two sites, the Centennial Farm at Stoneville, Miss., where cotton has been grown continuously “for at least 100 years,” Ebelhar says, and the Tribbett farm, which is not as productive as the Stoneville location. Ebelhar says the yield advantage comes from “the rotation effect. All other factors were the same.” Continue reading

Our Farms, Our Future Conference: Crafting a Vision for Sustainable Agriculture

What’s your vision for the future of sustainable agriculture? Join our nation’s leading farmers, ranchers, researchers and educators in St. Louis on April 3-5, 2018 to explore a wide range of innovative, sustainable solutions to agriculture’s most pressing dilemmas.

The Our Farms, Our Future Conference will address major food sustainability trends with presentations by a diverse group of farmers and ranchers using a wide range of systems to produce vegetables, grains, fruit, cattle, hogs, poultry and other livestock sustainably.

Please join us! Register now. Continue reading

Robotic weeding may be the way of the future

The future of weeding is here, and it comes in the form of a robot.

The growing popularity of robotic weeders for specialty crops has grown partly out of necessity, says Steven Fennimore, an extension specialist at the University of California, Davis. Specialty crops are vegetables like lettuce, broccoli, tomatoes, and onions. They are not mass-produced like corn, soybeans, and wheat. Continue reading

Getting the Best of Pests Webinar for January 17, 2018

Proper Pruning for Healthy and Beautiful Landscape Shrubs and Small TreesRick Smith, Pruning Guru, Inc. – Acworth, Georgia and Boxwood Blight: Identification and Management Strategies; Patrick Mawhinney, Prestige Shrub Tree & Turf – Atlanta, Georgia Continue reading

Georgia scientists help map the genetic code of peanuts

by J. Faith Peppers, University of Georgia

An international group of agricultural scientists, including University of Georgia and USDA scientists based in Georgia, have mapped the genetic code of the peanut. Results of the five-year research project give scientists around the world a map with which to unlock some of the genetic potential of the peanut plant.

“Mapping the genetic code of the peanut proved to be an especially difficult task, but the final product is one of the best ever generated,” said Steve Brown, executive director of The Peanut Foundation (IPF). “We now have a map that will help breeders incorporate desirable traits that benefit growers, processors, and most importantly, the consumers that enjoy delicious and nutritious peanut products all over the world.” Continue reading

Training is required for dicamba use

In Southeast Farm Press

In October 2017, the Environmental Protection Agency approved revised labeling for new formulations of dicamba products that are marketed as Engenia (BASF), Xtendimax (Monsanto), and FeXapan (DuPont).

These new herbicides were developed in conjunction with the release of dicamba-tolerant soybean (Roundup Ready2 Xtend soybean varieties).  All three products, which were first available for applications during the 2017 growing season, are now classified by the EPA as “RESTRICTED USE” pesticides, meaning that either a commercial or private pesticide certification license must be held by individuals who purchase and apply these products. Continue reading