New app from University of Missouri identifies herbicide injury

In Delta Farm Press

University of Missouri Extension introduced a new mobile app to identify herbicide injury at its annual Pest Management Field Day on July 10.

MU Extension weed specialist Mandy Bish says Herbicide Injury ID lets users send photos of injured plants to MU Extension for preliminary diagnosis and feedback. Users can also scroll through a library of more than 200 photos to look for similar types of damage.

Read the rest of the story in Delta Farm Press.

Watch the Recording of Rick Cooper’s Presentation “Turning Failure into Success: Bed Bug Management in Affordable Housing”

Chronic bed bug infestations and severe bed bug infestation rates in multifamily buildings are becoming more common due to the lack of effective bed bug management programs. But Bed Bugs can be controlled! Watch the recording of Rick Cooper’s presentation Turning Failure into Success: Bed Bug Management in Affordable Housing to learn how bed bugs are successfully controlled with examples of assessment-based management plans. You can find out 1) how and why bed bugs spread throughout living communities resulting in high infestation rates and escalating management costs, 2) why bed bug management has been largely ineffective in affordable housing communities 3), what methods are most effective for controlling bed bugs, 4) to apply a scientifically proven method for complex-wide management of bed bugs in affordable housing communities that results in long-term cost savings and improved quality of life for residents. Continue reading

APHIS Establishes a Host List for European Cherry Fruit Fly (Rhagoletis cerasi) and Conditions for Interstate Movement of Regulated Articles in Quarantined Areas

Effective immediately, the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has developed a host list for European cherry fruit fly (ECFF, Rhagoletis cerasi), and established conditions for the interstate movement of regulated articles from core areas quarantined for ECFF. These conditions include a systems approach to allow the interstate movement of cherry fruit from areas in a half-mile radius of quarantine ECFF detections without methyl bromide fumigation.

This action is required because the current fruit fly host list in the domestic quarantine regulations for fruit flies in 7 CFR 301.32 does not include ECFF hosts. The list is needed to identify ECFF hosts and to prevent the spread of this pest within the United States. Previous APHIS actions related to ECFF did not specify conditions for interstate movement of ECFF hosts from a quarantined area. This action specifies that, with the exception described below, all host articles must be moved in accordance with the conditions for interstate movement of host articles in 7 CFR 301.32-4 and 301.32-5. Continue reading

New Cover Crops and Water Quality Fact Sheets, Infographics and Slide Set Now Available

Barges carrying agricultural products aren’t the only traffic on the Mississippi River. Nutrients and sediment from across the Mississippi River Basin travel down the river until reaching the Gulf, where they linger and create low oxygen “dead zones” in which many fish cannot survive.

Monitoring of the Gulf hypoxic zone has shed some light on the important connections between agricultural practices and water quality. Although some practices contribute to the problem, other practices – like cover crops – provide a much needed solution. Continue reading

New turfgrass specialist begins at Texas A&M

by Gabe Saldana, Texas A&M AgriLife

Efficient varieties and informed management practices can help Texans make the most of turfgrasses’ natural human health and environmental benefits, said the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service’s new turfgrass specialist.

Dr. Lindsey Hoffman assumed her post at the Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center in Dallas July 9. She said her public outreach initiatives will deliver holistic approaches for coaxing maximum benefit from turfgrass use. Continue reading

Webinar: Biosecurity & Western Governors’ Association Invasive Species Initiative launch

Western Governors’ Association Chair and Hawaii Gov. David Ige will highlight the importance of invasive species management in the West and announce the locations of regional workshops as part of his Chairman’s Initiative during a webinar TODAY at 1:30 MT. Leaders in invasive species data management will also discuss WGA’s Invasive Species Data Management Protocol, a new effort to improve the interagency exchange of invasive species occurrence data in the West. Learn more and register now.

The webinar is TODAY at 1:30 Mountain time.

The webinar will be moderated by WGA Policy Advisor Bill Whitacre. Panelists include: Chuck Bargeron, Associate Director for Invasive Species and Information Technology, Center for Invasive Species & Ecosystem Health, University of Georgia; Pam Fuller, Program Leader, Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Database, USGS; Stinger Guala, Director of Biodiversity Information Serving Our Nation (BISON), USGS; Jamie Reaser, Executive Director, National Invasive Species Council; and Lori Scott, Interim President & CEO, and Chief Information Officer, NatureServe.

UK research shows urban gardens can aid in pollinator conservation

by Katie Pratt, University of Kentucky

A recent study conducted by University of Kentucky Department of Entomology researchers found that monarch butterflies and various bee species quickly find and use milkweeds in small urban gardens. They showed that monarchs and bees have preferences for the type and size of the plants.

“Our goal was to demonstrate to gardeners and homeowners that they can participate in meaningful pollinator conservation in their own backyard,” said Adam Baker, UK graduate student in the College of the Agriculture, Food and Environment. Continue reading