Updated Pesticide Label Review Manual Now Available

The Environmental Protection Agency has updated Chapters 15 and 16 of the Pesticide Label Review Manual (LRM). This manual began as a guide for EPA label reviewers, and now it also serves as a tool to assist EPA’s stakeholders in understanding the pesticide labeling process. The LRM is also useful in understanding approaches for how labels should generally be drafted.

Chapter 15: Company Name and Address – Removes non-label-related instructions on submitting address change requests, and updates the National Pesticide Information Center’s contact information, including new hours of operation. Continue reading

EPA Requests Comment on the Proposed Registration of New Biopesticide to Help Control Spread of Zika and Other Viruses

The Environmental Protection Agency is proposing to register ZAP Males®, a new microbial biopesticide that reduces local populations of Aedes albopictus (Asian Tiger) mosquitoes, which have the ability to spread numerous diseases of significant human health concern, including the Zika virus.

The registration would allow MosquitoMate, Inc. to sell the Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes (ZAP Males®) in the District of Columbia (DC) and the following states: California (CA), Connecticut (CT), Delaware (DE), Illinois (IL), Indiana (IN), Kentucky (KY), Massachusetts (MA), Maine (ME), Maryland (MD), Missouri (MO), New Hampshire (NH), New Jersey (NJ), Nevada (NV), New York (NY), Ohio (OH), Pennsylvania (PA), Rhode Island (RI), Tennessee (TN), Vermont (VT), and West Virginia (WV). Male mosquitoes do not bite people.   Continue reading

Periodic charts bring new meaning to Texas A&M wildlife researcher, others

by Steve Byrnes, Texas A&M AgriLife

To many of us, the mere mention of a “periodic table” conjures up pop quizzes, dread and the queasiness associated with past ninth grade chemistry classes dealing with the famous element chart, but to a Texas A&M AgriLife Research scientist and his colleagues, the term has taken on a whole new meaning.

Dr. Kirk Winemiller and doctoral students Dan Fitzgerald and Luke Bower, scientists within the department of wildlife and fisheries sciences at Texas A&M University, College Station, and Dr. Eric Pianka, ecologist at the University of Texas, Austin, published a paper two years ago in the journal Ecology Letters, that proposed a rationale for periodic tables of niches and offered ways to create them. Continue reading

Cornell develops the first robotic insect

In Cornell News

Flying insects can perform impressive acrobatic feats, simultaneously sensing and avoiding a striking hand or landing on moving surfaces, such as leaves or flowers blowing in the wind. Similarly, walking insects can display amazing speed, maneuverability, and robustness by rapidly sensing and avoiding predators, while foraging or seeking shelter in small spaces and unstructured terrains.

Silvia Ferrari, Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, with Robert J. Wood (Harvard University), is working toward a future where autonomous, small-scale robots would have similar capabilities, sensing and responding to their environments and maneuvering without human commands. These robots would be particularly invaluable for surveillance or reconnaissance missions in dangerous or remote environments. Continue reading

Cooperative Extension professional hosts pesticide drop-off event

by Catherine Clabby, NC Health News

For most people in farming with a bulging to-do list, rain is a disruptor. Not for Walter Adams this week in Lenoir County, where he hosted a pesticide drop-off event.

Farmers and others were urged to bring unneeded pesticides, herbicides and fungicides to a spot in South Kinston. People expert at safely disposing of the chemicals took them off their hands for free, no questions asked. Continue reading

SARE discusses cover crop survey results tomorrow in webinar

Tomorrow at noon EDT representatives from SARE, Conservation Technology Information Center (CTIC) and the American Seed Trade Association (ASTA) will host a media call following the rollout of the 2017 cover crop survey report. This marks the fifth consecutive year of the national survey which asks farmers about their views and experiences with cover crops.

Join us to hear about key findings from this survey of 2,012 farmers and to participate in a Q&A with survey organizers. Continue reading

Improper mosquito control on livestock can do more harm than good, expert warns

by Steve Byrnes, Texas A&M AgriLife

In an effort to save their livestock from the torment caused by the plague of mosquitoes in the wake of Hurricane Harvey, some producers are making the mistake of misusing chemicals to control the pests, said a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service expert.

“The results can be potentially disastrous,” said Dr. Sonja Swiger, AgriLife Extension livestock entomologist at Stephenville. “Misuse of potent chemicals can quickly become an example of ‘the cure is worse than the malady,’ not only for the animals being treated but also to the environment. Continue reading