Webinar: Mitigating Potential Impacts of Neonicotinoid Insecticides on Wetland Ecosystems

What will you learn?

Participants will learn about opportunities to mitigate for potential risks of neonicotinoid insecticides to aquatic systems. Learn more…

Presented by USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service – Science and Technology Continue reading

LSU demonstrates what drones can do for agriculture

In Delta Farm Press

Drones can provide an aerial view of a crop’s progress and health, but they won’t replace scouting fields on foot, LSU AgCenter researchers advised at a March 16 drone workshop held at the AgCenter Dean Lee Research Station.

Dennis Burns, LSU AgCenter county agent in Tensas Parish, said insects can’t be detected by air unless crop damage is extensive. “The images are only going to show so much.” Continue reading

Webinar: High Tunnel Systems

What will you learn?

Participants will learn about techniques used in high tunnel cropping systems to address issues with salinity, nutrient management, and pest management. Learn more…

Sponsored by USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service – Science and Technology Continue reading

Nominations to the Pesticide Program Dialogue Committee Open until April 21, 2017

EPA’s Office of Pesticide Programs is currently accepting nominations for the Pesticide Program Dialogue Committee (PPDC). A federal advisory committee, PPDC provides advice and recommendations to the EPA on issues associated with pesticide regulatory development and reform initiatives, evolving public policy and program implementation issues, and science issues associated with evaluating and reducing risks from the use of pesticides.

To maintain the broad representation outlined in the PPDC charter, nominees will be selected to represent: federal, state, local, and tribal governments; pesticide industry and trade associations; pesticide users; grower and commodity groups; environmental and public interest groups; farm worker organizations; public health organizations; animal welfare groups; and academia. We seek highly qualified, racially and ethnically diverse candidates representing any of these groups. Continue reading

Weeds: Nature’s Graffiti – How IPM Can Fix That

Weeds of concern and their control varies widely by state. The attitudes of school districts toward weeds also differ depending on whether the weeds are in the recess yard or athletic field. How do school facility managers or contracted turf management firms contend with weeds?

Learn how to observe your school grounds with an eye toward identifying weeds and their locations. This webinar, sponsored by the Environmental Protection Agency, will provide you with Integrated Pest Management (IPM) based control tactics for common weeds. IPM is an approach that uses a hierarchy of practices, including exclusion, sanitation, biological, and mechanical methods, to reduce unnecessary pesticide exposure while providing sustainable pest control. Continue reading

Pale Cyst Nematode (PCN) Supplemental Environment Assessment Available for Review

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) is making available to the public a supplemental environmental assessment (SEA) for the Pale Cyst Nematode Program (PCN) in Bingham and Bonneville Counties, Idaho. A draft SEA was made available for review and comment on April 28, 2016. This updated SEA includes revisions as a result of comments received and additional information regarding the program.  Anyone wishing to obtain a copy of the document should contact Brian Marschman by mail at USDA APHIS PPQ, 9134 W. Blackeagle Dr., Boise, ID 83709; or at: Brian.L.Marschman@aphis.usda.gov). The document can also be viewed at:  http://www.aphis.usda.gov/planthealth/pcn Continue reading

Clemson students studying ways to improve value of cover crops

In Southeast Farm Press

by Denise Attaway

A group of Clemson students is determining how to use shredded leaves to help increase the value of roller-crimped cover crops.

Cover crops are crops planted primarily to naturally manage soil erosion, soil fertility, soil and water quality, weeds, pests, diseases, biodiversity and wildlife. Roller-crimping involves attaching roller-crimpers to tractors, rolling over cover crops to flatten and damage them, leaving behind a thick mulch. Rye grass is the cover crop used in this study. Continue reading