EPA settles with Amazon for distributions of illegal pesticides

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced an agreement with Amazon Services LLC to protect the public from the hazards posed by unregistered and misbranded pesticide products. The agreement settles allegations that Amazon committed nearly four thousand violations of the “Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act” – dating back to 2013 – for selling and distributing imported pesticide products that were not licensed for sale in the United States.

“This agreement will dramatically reduce the online sale of illegal pesticides, which pose serious threats to public health in communities across America,” said EPA Region 10 Administrator Chris Hladick. “Amazon is committed to closely monitoring and removing illegal pesticides from its website, and EPA will continue to work hard to ensure these harmful products never reach the marketplace.”

More in HortDaily

WEBINAR: Managing Rose Rosette Disease in the Landscape

Rose Rosette Disease (RRD) has been making an unwelcome appearance in landscapes across the United States. A virus carried by an eriophyid mite, this disease can affect all cultivated roses, including shrubs, hybrid teas, floribunda, grandifloras, and miniatures. Researchers and breeders are hard at work developing solutions to combat RRD. In the meantime, there are many steps landscapers can take to help prevent its spread.

Don’t miss the opportunity to attend this free webinar hosted by Star Roses and Plants and presented by a panel of RRD experts. Continue reading

Soybean cyst nematode resistant soybeans help with control–but only with rotation

In Delta Farm Press

New University of Missouri Extension plant pathologist Kaitlyn Bissonnette brings research on soybean cyst nematode (SCN) management to Missouri.

SCN numbers are growing in Missouri as farmers devote more acres to soybean production. SCN infests about 75 percent of Missouri fields, according to a recent survey by MU College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources researcher Melissa Mitchum. Many of these fields have high SCN egg counts. Continue reading

APHIS Launches Webpage for Frequently Requested Records

The United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) is launching a new “Frequently Requested Records” page on our Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) e-reading room, in accordance with the FOIA statute. The new page will contain copies of frequently requested records, making it easier for our stakeholders to find information.

On the new page, we will post copies of FOIA-processed records that have been requested and released three or more times.  We will also post items we believe are likely to be requested multiple times.  Finally, on this page, APHIS may in its discretion also post records that it believes are of interest to the public, regardless of a legal requirement to do so.  The page is searchable by keyword or program.  APHIS will continue to update this page on a monthly basis. Continue reading

UGA research hopes the key to fighting cowpea curculio lies in snap bean genes

By Julie Jernigan, University of Georgia

Once a top agricultural commodity in Georgia, the Southern pea’s presence in the state is now minimal. Growers are reluctant to plant the crop due to a tiny weevil, the cowpea curculio.

The cowpea curculio is a small, dark weevil that originated in Mexico. It feeds and lays eggs in the pods of Southern peas, making the peas unmarketable. The current management tactic involves spraying regularly with old and new insecticides, but the weevil has such high resistance that this technique has little impact. Continue reading

Outcrossing between johnsongrass, sorghum studied

Dr. Muthu Bagavathiannan, Texas A&M AgriLife

Johnsongrass and sorghum might be considered “kissing kin,” but a Texas A&M AgriLife Research team wants to know if there is more going on in the grain sorghum production fields and bar ditches of South and Central Texas than meets the eye.

Dr. Muthu Bagavathiannan, weed scientist; Dr. Bill Rooney, sorghum breeder; and Dr. Patricia Klein, sorghum geneticist and molecular biologist, all with AgriLife Research in College Station, have teamed up to study gene flow between sorghum and johnsongrass. Continue reading

EPA Extends Comment Period for Neonicotinoid Risk Assessments

At the request of stakeholders, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is extending the public comment period for recently released neonicotinoid insecticide risk assessments from February 20, 2018, to April 21, 2018. The Agency published preliminary ecological and human health risk assessments in December 2017 for the neonicotinoid insecticides, clothianidin, thiamethoxam, and dinotefuran, and a preliminary ecological risk assessment for imidacloprid (assessing risks to birds, mammals, non-target insects, and plants). In December 2017, the Agency also published new cotton and citrus benefits assessments for foliar applications of the neonicotinoids, as well as a response to public comments on the 2014 Benefits of Neonicotinoid Seed Treatment to Soybean Production Continue reading