Sustainable Agriculture Program at Central Carolina Community College accepting applications

Ready to learn more about the Principles and Practices of Regenerative Agriculture? The Sustainable Agriculture Program at CCCC in Pittsboro is accepting applications NOW for Fall 2018.

Apply online: http://www.cccc.edu/admissions/apply/

At CCCC’s sustainable agriculture program students have the opportunity for “Real Farming- Right Now”. The Pittsboro-based program has an on-campus, year-round certified organic farm that is an integral part of teaching and learning. A commitment to building and stewarding healthy soil through regenerative practices is at the heart of this entrepreneurial focused program. Continue reading

UGA CAES team researching whiteflies statewide

By Clint Thompson, University of Georgia

Silverleaf whiteflies devastated Georgia’s cotton and fall vegetable crops last year. In response to this crisis, a team of University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences research and UGA Cooperative Extension specialists is studying the pests statewide to help cotton and vegetable farmers avoid another year of disappointing crops.

“Teams are an important part of UGA. Many of the issues agriculturists face today require a collection of scientists from differing disciplines with differing expertise to address complex issues. The silverleaf whitefly fits the bill here,” said Phillip Roberts, UGA Extension cotton and soybean entomologist and Whitefly Team member. “Not only are whiteflies a direct pest of plants as a result of feeding, but they also transmit several viruses to vegetables that can have a devastating effect on virus-susceptible crops.” Continue reading

Tips for dealing with carpenter bees

By Wade Hutcheson, University of Georgia

We used to try to hit them with baseball bats. A tennis racket would have been a better choice, but there were no tennis courts on our farm.

We would also catch them going into their holes, plug the hole and listen to their angry reply. Carpenter bees were a lot of fun for growing boys. Continue reading

North Carolina bee expert demonstrates queen bee health on Capitol Hill

As Congress considers the Farm Bill and agricultural appropriations, agricultural researchers from a variety of disciplines are updating Congressional members and staff on research covering current challenges and emerging threats in agriculture, food and natural resources.

David Tarpy, CALS professor of entomology and Extension apiculturist, is participating in a national exhibition in Washington, D.C., on June 6 to help demonstrate how multiple types of U.S. Department of Agriculture funding (intramural, extramural, competitive and capacity) work together to bolster American innovation. Continue reading

Engineered cotton uses weed-suppression chemical as nutrient

by Kay Ledbetter, Texas A&M AgriLife

A newly developed fertilizer system will provide nutrition to engineered cotton crops worldwide and a deadly dose to weeds that are increasingly herbicide resistant, according to a Texas A&M AgriLife Research study.

The new system applies phosphite to cotton crops engineered to express a certain gene — a gene that makes cotton able to process the phosphite into nutrition while the same compound suppresses weeds that are unable to use it, researchers said. Continue reading

APHIS Updates Regulated Areas in Miami-Dade County for Giant African Snail (Lissachatina fulica, formally Achatina fulica)

On May 1, 2017, the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) removed giant African snail (GAS) regulated area Zone O from the list of quarantined areas in Miami-Dade County, Florida. Subsequently, on December 21, 2017, APHIS also removed areas Zone D, Zone Q, Zone R, and Zone U. APHIS and the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS) collaborated to develop the protocol for removing areas from quarantine. Under the protocol, FDACS and APHIS use the following criteria to deregulate a quarantined area/zone:

  • Surveillance and treatment efforts for 17 months with no detection of live GAS
  • An additional 19 months of surveillance with no detection of live GAS
  • A minimum of one negative detector dog survey
  • A minimum of one negative night survey, when snails can be more active

Continue reading

Cotton growers should be patient in treating for target spot

In Delta Farm Press

Conditions in west Tennessee are setting up as conducive for target spot infestations in cotton. Or maybe not.

Heather Kelly, Extension pathologist at the University of Tennessee Research and Extension Center in Jackson, says several factors need to coincide for target spot to pose a threat to cotton. Continue reading