APHIS Expands the Asian Citrus Psyllid (Diaphorina citri) Quarantined Area in Arizona

Effectively immediately, the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), in cooperation with the Arizona Department of Agriculture (ADA) and the Arizona citrus industry, is expanding the area quarantined for the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) to include all counties in Arizona. APHIS is taking this action in response to the ADA Director’s Administrative Order (DAO 16-01) implementing a statewide ACP quarantine.

APHIS is applying safeguarding measures on the interstate movement of regulated articles from Arizona. This action is necessary to prevent the spread of ACP to non-infested areas of the United States. The specific changes to the regulated areas in Arizona are attached and can also be found at:

http://www.aphis.usda.gov/plant-health/citrus-greening

APHIS will publish a notice of this change in the Federal Register.

The war on the boll weevil

by Dominic Reisig, NC State University

In NC State University News

The boll weevil (Anthonomus grandis) is not much to look at – just a grayish, little beetle with an impressively long snout. But this particular beetle, and its hunger for cotton, was powerful enough to forge an unprecedented partnership between farmers, legislators and scientists. And that partnership showed how much can be accomplished when scientists and farmers work together.

What adult boll weevils lack in size they make up for with their larvae’s ability to feed on and destroy cotton. Boll weevils entered the U.S. from Mexico in the late 1800s, when they were first spotted in Texas. By the 1920s they had spread through all of the major cotton-producing areas in the country. The scope of the damage was breathtaking, as were the control efforts thrown at this insect: at one time, one-third of the insecticide used in the U.S. was used to combat boll weevils. Continue reading

Proposals Requested for Cooperative Agreement to Train Healthcare Providers

EPA’s Office of Pesticide Programs is soliciting applications from eligible parties to manage a cooperative agreement to help educate the medical community on how to recognize and treat pesticide-related health conditions. The long-term goal of the project is to achieve improved health for communities at risk for overexposure to pesticides through outreach, technical assistance and training to increase knowledge and awareness of environmental and occupational health risks.

This is a national environmental and occupational health effort solicited by doctors, clinicians, and state health departments. With this award, EPA seeks to build on the progress of the previous project titled “From the Fields to the Exam Room: Integrating the Recognition, Management and Prevention of Pesticide Poisonings into the Primary Care Setting.” The publication “Recognition and Management of Pesticide Poisoning” was an earlier product of the initiative. Continue reading

Hybridized cotton reverses resistance of pink bollworm to Bt cotton

in Southwest Farm Press

Researchers with the University of Arizona and China discovered a surprising strategy to reverse pink bollworm resistance to genetically engineered cotton.

Cotton growers have been able to use genetically engineered cotton to fight the pink bollworm. This has happened as scientists have been able to produce pest-killing proteins from the widespread soil bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis, or Bt. Without adequate countermeasures, scientists have discovered that pests can quickly evolve resistance. Continue reading

Wondering what has been going on with your juniper and cypress trees?

by Adam Russell, Texas A&M AgriLife

It’s been a tough 2017 so far for juniper and cypress varieties used in landscapes, as pests and diseases make the rounds, causing blight and tree die-offs.

Kevin Ong, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service plant pathologist and director of the Texas Plant Disease Diagnostic Laboratory in College Station, said there are several different possible disease or pest issues plaguing juniper and cypress varieties around the state, from the Gulf Coast to Central, North and East Texas. Continue reading

Preventative measures can help protect against mosquito bites

by Katie Pratt, University of Kentucky

Mosquitoes are appearing earlier than normal this year. University of Kentucky entomologists encourage Kentuckians to take precautions to prevent mosquito bites on themselves and their pets.

“Mosquitoes breed in standing water. The recent rains we have had, coupled with the upcoming warm weather, may help them get off to a strong start,” said Grayson Brown, entomologist in the UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment. Continue reading

Understanding, Building, & Maintaining Soil Health – workshop

Description:

This workshop for farmers and home gardeners will cover the basics of soil health, including SC Soils 101, soil sampling techniques, interpreting soil test results, and using cover crops to improve soil health in both home gardens and commercial vegetable operations. We will also tour City Roots Farm and learn about their soil building practices.

Thursday, June 1st
9AM – 2:30PM
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