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    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
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2019 Monarch Conservation Webinar Series

monarch

We are excited to announce the topics for the 2019 Monarch Conservation Webinar Series! The Monarch Joint Venture is partnering with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center to put on another year full of informative and inspiring webinars on all things monarch.

Starting in February, webinars will be held live on the 4th Tuesday of the month at 2 PM Eastern Time. (Plus a bonus webinar in March!) The November and December dates have been moved to avoid conflicting with major holidays. Each webinar will be recorded and available here for later viewing as well.

Check out the webinar titles and dates below, and click on a title to register!

Please note this list is subject to change. Our events page will have the most up to date information on our webinar series, as well as a calendar of additional monarch-related events. Find it here.

We look forward to sharing this great series with you! Thank you for joining us.

Chemical Component of IPM Gets the Spotlight during National Pesticide Safety Education Month

The second annual National Pesticide Safety Education Month gets underway February 1st, to reinforce core principles of safe handling and use and to raise awareness of and support for the land-grant university Pesticide Safety Education Programs (PSEPs). Pesticide safety is an absolute requirement when using the chemical component of Integrated Pest Management (IPM).

“IPM considers the variety of pest management methods and teaches how to properly manage pests, whether the approach contains chemicals or not,” says Cecil Tharp, Montana State University PSEP. “A vital role of PSEPs in teaching IPM is to pass along the message that it is not solely pesticides that should be used to deal with pests,” adds Jon Johnson, Penn State University PSEP.

“We take all the IPM strategies and do a lot of planning to prevent pests. If there is an unacceptable pest infestation at some point, pesticides may be required and their safe use is essential,” explains Lisa Blecker, University of California PSEP. “The IPM process has the key role in helping applicators understand all the available tools and make appropriate decisions to control the pest,” notes Clyde Ogg, University of Nebraska PSEP. “That includes being as smart as we can in the use of pesticides,” adds Gene Merkl, Mississippi State University PSEP.

“While PSEPs are often focused on teaching the safe use of pesticides, pesticides are only one possible choice in the IPM toolbox and not always the best choice,” says Mimi Rose, Ohio State University PSEP. “Even if the applicator chooses to use a pesticide, there are other pest management practices that must also be followed to successfully manage the pest.” Don Renchie, Texas A&M PSEP, summarizes the big picture – “When everyone understands the importance of IPM strategies and other best management practices, it avoids problems for the general public and the environment, and for pesticide applicators. With or without pesticides, protecting human health and the environment is always the goal.”

Visit the National Pesticide Safety Education Month webpage to review basic pesticide safety principles and much more. Everyone is invited to share the link with others and use the educational resources, self-assessment and quiz to promote safe use of pesticides, whenever pesticides are used.

-Submitted by Carol Somody, Syngenta

Deadline extended for Friends of IPM award nominations

We are extending the deadline for nominations for our our annual Friends of Southern IPM Award program. This program recognizes outstanding work in IPM in the southern region. We have two kinds of awards: one for IPM professionals and one for graduate students.

Deadline for nominations is Friday, December 21, 2018.

You’ll find the Calls for Nomination for these awards, along with cover forms, at http://projects.ipmcenters.org/Southern/public/ListRFAs.cfm . Click on the nomination call that you wish to use to get to the Call documents and the nomination form. You will be using our Proposal / Project Management System (PPMS) to submit your nominations this year, so please be sure to find the instructions for that in the Call for Nomination and follow the steps.

Professional awards:

There are 6 categories of awards: Bright Idea (research-oriented or new idea), IPM Implementer (someone who practices IPM in the real world), IPM Educator (extension or teacher), Pulling Together (group), Future Leader (young professional), and Lifetime Achievement (seasoned professional). The award is open to anyone in the region demonstrating excellence in the field of IPM. In fact, we welcome the opportunity to recognize those outside of the university setting, such as growers, school IPM coordinators, teachers, etc.

Award winners will be publicly recognized at an event of their choice.

The Call for Nominations for the professional awards is at https://bit.ly/2pVhJMg.

Graduate Student awards:

The Friends of Southern IPM graduate student award will go to two graduate students: one Masters student and one Ph.D. student.

The graduate student award, in addition to a public presentation of the award, comes with a sizable monetary award. The winning Masters student receives $2,000, and the winning doctoral student receives $3,000. All winners—including in the professional category—must assist with a story about their work or conduct a webinar before receiving the financial award. Please read the Call for Nominations for more information.

Each department can nominate UP TO 3 Masters students and UP TO 3 Ph.D. students. Each department can submit up to six nominations, and universities can submit from more than one department (I.e., entomology, plant pathology, weed science, horticulture, etc. departments can submit from the same university).

The Call for Nominations for the graduate student awards is at https://bit.ly/2NHjs1l.

Nominations for both award programs consist of a cover form and a two-page written nomination. Additional materials may be submitted in support of the nomination but are not necessary. The bulk of the description and evidence of the person’s or group’s qualifications of the award should be in the two-page nomination, NOT in the additional materials.

Please share this notice with anyone you work with who may wish to nominate someone for either of these awards.

If you have any questions about either of these awards, or you have trouble navigating the PPMS system, please direct them to Henry Fadamiro at fadamhy@auburn.edu or 334-844-5098 or Alex Belskis at abelskis@cipm.info or 919-513-8183.

Agenda for November 1 Biotechnology/Emerging Technologies Seminar Now Available

As previously announced, through a series of sessions, EPA will provide an overview of emerging technologies as they relate to pesticides and provide opportunities for participants to ask questions about these emerging technologies. The seminar will be held on November 1, 2018, from 8:30 AM to 12:00 PM Eastern Time, in EPA’s first floor conference center at One Potomac Yard South, 2777 South Crystal Drive, Arlington, VA 22202.

The public is invited to attend this seminar in person or through a webinar. No advance registration is required. Please be aware of the ID requirements for visiting the Office of Pesticide Programs. View additional information on the ID requirements, as well as information on the location of EPA’s building and how to reach it by public transportation or car. The ID requirements are under the Building Access tab, and transportation information is under the HQ Buildings in Virginia tab. Continue reading

2018 All Bugs Good and Bad Webinar Series on Lice, scabies, and mites this Friday!

This month’s All Bugs Good and Bad Webinar will take place this Friday, November 2 at 1:00 pm Central time.

Insect pests are definitely a nuisance on our landscapes and lawns. When the pests are associated with humans, the nuisance factor multiplies. Get a plan! Learn about their biology, distribution, and management strategies in this webinar presented by Dr. Nancy Hinkle, University of Georgia. Continue reading

Forest Management Affects how Beetle Outbreaks and Wildfire alter Ecosystems: Lessons from Northern Colorado and the Fraser Experimental Forest

Forest Management Affects how Beetle Outbreaks and Wildfire alter Ecosystems:  Lessons from Northern Colorado and the Fraser Experimental Forest – Chuck Rhoades, Rocky Mountain Research Station

Date: Tuesday, October 30, 2018

Time: 12 pm MDT

REGISTER | GET CEUS  Continue reading

Texas A&M leads $5.7 million research project to attack annual bluegrass

by Kay Ledbetter, Texas A&M AgriLife

The most widely grown irrigated crop in the U.S. – turfgrass – is being threatened by annual bluegrass, and Texas A&M AgriLife is leading a project to find solutions.

Texas A&M AgriLife is joining scientists across the nation to address the threat through a project called Research and Extension to Address Herbicide-Resistance Epidemic in Annual Bluegrass in Managed Turf Systems. Continue reading