2019 Monarch Conservation Webinar Series

monarch

We are excited to announce the topics for the 2019 Monarch Conservation Webinar Series! The Monarch Joint Venture is partnering with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center to put on another year full of informative and inspiring webinars on all things monarch.

Starting in February, webinars will be held live on the 4th Tuesday of the month at 2 PM Eastern Time. (Plus a bonus webinar in March!) The November and December dates have been moved to avoid conflicting with major holidays. Each webinar will be recorded and available here for later viewing as well.

Check out the webinar titles and dates below, and click on a title to register!

Please note this list is subject to change. Our events page will have the most up to date information on our webinar series, as well as a calendar of additional monarch-related events. Find it here.

We look forward to sharing this great series with you! Thank you for joining us.

Chemical Component of IPM Gets the Spotlight during National Pesticide Safety Education Month

The second annual National Pesticide Safety Education Month gets underway February 1st, to reinforce core principles of safe handling and use and to raise awareness of and support for the land-grant university Pesticide Safety Education Programs (PSEPs). Pesticide safety is an absolute requirement when using the chemical component of Integrated Pest Management (IPM).

“IPM considers the variety of pest management methods and teaches how to properly manage pests, whether the approach contains chemicals or not,” says Cecil Tharp, Montana State University PSEP. “A vital role of PSEPs in teaching IPM is to pass along the message that it is not solely pesticides that should be used to deal with pests,” adds Jon Johnson, Penn State University PSEP.

“We take all the IPM strategies and do a lot of planning to prevent pests. If there is an unacceptable pest infestation at some point, pesticides may be required and their safe use is essential,” explains Lisa Blecker, University of California PSEP. “The IPM process has the key role in helping applicators understand all the available tools and make appropriate decisions to control the pest,” notes Clyde Ogg, University of Nebraska PSEP. “That includes being as smart as we can in the use of pesticides,” adds Gene Merkl, Mississippi State University PSEP.

“While PSEPs are often focused on teaching the safe use of pesticides, pesticides are only one possible choice in the IPM toolbox and not always the best choice,” says Mimi Rose, Ohio State University PSEP. “Even if the applicator chooses to use a pesticide, there are other pest management practices that must also be followed to successfully manage the pest.” Don Renchie, Texas A&M PSEP, summarizes the big picture – “When everyone understands the importance of IPM strategies and other best management practices, it avoids problems for the general public and the environment, and for pesticide applicators. With or without pesticides, protecting human health and the environment is always the goal.”

Visit the National Pesticide Safety Education Month webpage to review basic pesticide safety principles and much more. Everyone is invited to share the link with others and use the educational resources, self-assessment and quiz to promote safe use of pesticides, whenever pesticides are used.

-Submitted by Carol Somody, Syngenta

Western IPM Center Director

POSITION PURPOSE: The University of California, Agriculture and Natural Resources (UC ANR), is seeking a Director to assume leadership for its Western IPM Center within the UC Statewide IPM Program. The Director will provide overall leadership of the Western IPM Center, with responsibility for its successful management and operations, including supervision of Western IPM Center staff. The Director will collaborate with a wide range of stakeholders to identify regional IPM need and objectives and formulate strategies to address important IPM issues. The Director will communicate with the WIPMC Advisory Committee and represent the Western IPM Center to other agencies at the state, regional, and national levels to identify opportunities for collaboration. The Director will oversee official responses to federal agency information requests that will be prepared by the Center’s regional Network Coordinators and other state contacts. The Director combines a broad knowledge of integrated pest management and how it is used in agriculture, natural landscapes and community settings with demonstrated collegial management success and teambuilding skills. Education and training in IPM science are necessary to be a valuable contributor in identifying and promoting Western IPM needs and priorities. Strong leadership and management skills are necessary to build and lead teams of colleagues, collaborators and employees to achieve the Center’s vision of “A healthier West with fewer pests.”

See attached flier for more information.

Western IPM Center Director

 

IPM Position at New Mexico State University

Position: Extension Urban/Small Farms Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Specialist

New Mexico State University, College of Agricultural, Consumer & Environmental Sciences, Department of Extension Plant Sciences announces the opening of an Extension Urban/Small Farms Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Specialist position. The Urban/Small Farms IPM Specialist will have a tenure-track appointment with the rank of Assistant or Associate Professor (75% Extension/25% Research).  A Ph.D. is required in Entomology, Plant Pathology, Weed Science or related field, with emphasis on and/or experience in IPM.  The attached flyer provides a more complete description of the position.  The position will include joint appointments in the Department of Extension Plant Sciences and Department of Entomology Plant Pathology and Weed Science in proportion to the extension and research appointments (respectively).  Questions regarding the position should be directed to the search committee chair, Dr. Richard Heerema, rjheerem@nmsu.edu, (575) 646-2921.

Final IPM Ad Flyer

Webinar: Organic Management of spotted wing drosophila

Spotted wing drosophila (SWD) has emerged as a devastating pest of small and stone fruits worldwide. We have organized a webinar to provide you with the most updated information on everything you need to know for organic management of SWD. Continue reading

Citrus grower education program slated for May 9 in Mission, TX

An educational program for Rio Grande Valley citrus growers on the practical aspects of new water conservation technologies will be held from 8 a.m.-3 p.m. May 9 at the Lone Star Citrus Growers headquarters, 9625 N. Moorefield Road, Mission.

Registration will begin at 8 a.m. at the citrus growers’ packing house. The program is co-hosted by the Texas Water Resources Institute, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service, Texas A&M University-Kingsville Citrus Center and the Texas Water Development Board. Continue reading

New chemical law requires the agency to look at chemicals that were grandfathered in under old law

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), is moving swiftly to propose how it will prioritize and evaluate chemicals, given that the final processes must be in place within the first year of the new law’s enactment, or before June 22, 2017.

“After 40 years we can finally address chemicals currently in the marketplace,” said Jim Jones, EPA’s Assistant Administrator for the Office of Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention. “Today’s action will set into motion a process to swiftly evaluate chemicals and meet deadlines required under, and essential to, implementing the new law.” Continue reading