2018 All Bugs Good and Bad Webinar Series on Lice, scabies, and mites this Friday!

This month’s All Bugs Good and Bad Webinar will take place this Friday, November 2 at 1:00 pm Central time.

Insect pests are definitely a nuisance on our landscapes and lawns. When the pests are associated with humans, the nuisance factor multiplies. Get a plan! Learn about their biology, distribution, and management strategies in this webinar presented by Dr. Nancy Hinkle, University of Georgia. Continue reading

Forest Management Affects how Beetle Outbreaks and Wildfire alter Ecosystems: Lessons from Northern Colorado and the Fraser Experimental Forest

Forest Management Affects how Beetle Outbreaks and Wildfire alter Ecosystems:  Lessons from Northern Colorado and the Fraser Experimental Forest – Chuck Rhoades, Rocky Mountain Research Station

Date: Tuesday, October 30, 2018

Time: 12 pm MDT

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Texas A&M leads $5.7 million research project to attack annual bluegrass

by Kay Ledbetter, Texas A&M AgriLife

The most widely grown irrigated crop in the U.S. – turfgrass – is being threatened by annual bluegrass, and Texas A&M AgriLife is leading a project to find solutions.

Texas A&M AgriLife is joining scientists across the nation to address the threat through a project called Research and Extension to Address Herbicide-Resistance Epidemic in Annual Bluegrass in Managed Turf Systems. Continue reading

APHIS Invites Public Comment on Measures to Promote the Conservation of the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) is considering options for actions it can take to support the conservation of the southwestern willow flycatcher. This endangered bird nests and feeds in dense forests of willow and non-native saltcedar (tamarisk trees) along southwestern rivers. Continue reading

Associate Professor of Controlled Environment Engineering

Position:           Assistant Professor, Tenure-track.

Location:          Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-5701. The academic home for this position is the Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. Continue reading

APHIS Story Map: Emerald Ash Borer (EAB)

Check out the new APHIS story map about the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) – An interactive story map of the USDA’s history of combating the infestation and the continuing efforts to protect ash trees in the U.S. If your organization would like to partner with APHIS on EAB biological control efforts, please email EAB.Biocontrol.Program@aphis.usda.gov.

Epidemic in Turf Management: Herbicide Resistance in Annual Bluegrass

by Patricia McDaniels, University of Tennessee
Annual bluegrass is one of the most common weeds of turfgrass on golf courses, sports fields and sod farms, not to mention residential and commercial lawns. Unfortunately this nemesis of pristine landscapes has also developed resistance to many common herbicides. Researchers with the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture are participating in a national effort to address what many landscape managers call an epidemic of herbicide resistance in annual bluegrass plaguing managed turf systems.
As part of a $3.2 million, 15-state USDA Specialty Crop Research Initiative grant, UTIA turfgrass researcher Jim Brosnan will lead a team of Tennessee weed scientists in sampling annual bluegrass populations across the state. The team will travel the state’s three grand divisions to take samples from golf courses, sports fields, both residential and commercial lawns, as well as sod production farms. The sampled specimens will then be propagated in a controlled laboratory setting and tested for resistance to commonly used herbicides. The goal is to quantify the scope of herbicide resistance in annual bluegrass populations across Tennessee. Additionally, Brosnan’s team will also be developing new diagnostic assays to detect herbicide resistance in annual bluegrass, researching annual bluegrass seed persistence in soil, as well as the effects of turfgrass cultural practices on annual bluegrass infestation.

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