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PhD student or a Postdoc position: Invasive wood borers

Join the Forest Entomology team (http://www.ambrosiasymbiosis.org/) at the University of Florida on our quest to discover which of the thousands of wood borer species in exotic jungles have the potential to be the next big invader into American forests. We are looking for passion in areas ranging from molecular ecology to integrative taxonomy to biosecurity regulation, someone who can master the flow of material from a foreign jungle to a DNA sequencer, someone who will love analyzing their data, writing their manuscripts, and strategically posting on social media. Continue reading

Georgia’s pecan producers need to scout for pests like the Asian ambrosia beetle

by Clint Thompson, University of Georgia

Pecan season may be over, but Georgia’s producers should continue to scout for pests, like the Asian ambrosia beetle, that could impact future crops.

The first 2018 sighting of the beetle in Georgia came from a Brooks County orchard last week, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan specialist Lenny Wells, who wrote about it in his blog at blog.extension.uga.edu/pecan. Wells stresses that, with temperatures at or just above 80 degrees Fahrenheit in southern Georgia this week, ambrosia beetle activity will likely increase. Continue reading

What’s eating my maple trees?

With their bright red or yellow leaves glowing during this time of year, maple trees are one of the most impressive trees in fall. In most Southern states, they are native, whether they are red, Norway, (Norway is a non-native, invasive tree) Freeman or silver. In the northern states, sugar maples provide us with rich maple syrup for pancakes and waffles. But their beauty and usefulness don’t make them immune from serving as lunch to many insect pests, so if you find that the leaves on some of your maple trees are disappearing rather than winding up on the ground, below is a list of some of the most common insect pests of maples.

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A New Invasive Insect and Disease Threatens the Avocado Industry

While on vacation in Hilton Head, South Carolina in August 2004, Minnesota plant pathologist Kathy Kromroy hiked through the Newhall Audubon Nature Preserve. As she walked, she noticed several trees drooping with wilted leaves. A park display blamed the death of the trees on a long drought, but Kathy noticed that only one tree species was dying. All of the other trees were still green and thriving.

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