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University of Kentucky entomologist details ways to prevent tick bites

By Katie Pratt, University of Kentucky

Tick season is underway and a University of Kentucky entomologist is reminding Kentuckians to take precautions to protect themselves and their loved ones from tick bites.

“In tick-prone areas, check yourself, children and other family members every two hours, and very thoroughly after returning home from hikes and other outdoor activities,” said Lee Townsend, UK extension entomologist in the College of Agriculture, Food and Environment. “Common places to find ticks are behind the knees, around the waist, under arms, neck and head.” Continue reading

Research by Friends of IPM graduate student winner helps Tennessee ranchers with tick scouting

Cattle owners in western Tennessee need to be vigilant for four species of cattle tick, while cattle owners in eastern Tennessee need to watch for only two species. Why? That’s what research done by a Masters student at the University of Tennessee aims to address.

Masters student David Theuret, who won one of this year’s Friends of Southern IPM graduate student awards, focused on ticks infesting cattle during his graduate program. To assist cattle producers with scouting, Theuret first sampled ticks in Tennessee to determine which species were present and what times of year producers would need to watch for them. Continue reading

Ticks to look out for – by state

Even though nearly all media attention is on mosquitoes this summer, most people fear ticks more. At A Bug Day in Gastonia in May, I talked to several people who weren’t as worried about mosquitoes as they were about ticks. Perhaps that’s because ticks attach to a person and hang on for a while.

If a tick bites you or someone in your family, you’re probably going to go to the doctor’s office. And what is the doctor going to ask? Probably what kind of tick bit you! Each tick transmits a different pathogen, so it’s important to know which species of tick bit you. That will help the doctor determine what to treat you for. Continue reading

Tips to prevent ticks

In University of Georgia’s Landscape Alert

Ticks are in every part of Georgia. The most common ticks in Georgia are lone star ticks, carriers of uncommon diseases called “ehrlichiosis.” However, the American dog tick is also present in the state, and it is known to carry Rocky Mountain spotted fever—a flu-like illness that can cause complications for young children and those with suppressed immune systems.

The best course of action to prevent disease is to avoid tick bites altogether, said Nancy Hinkle, a UGA Extension veterinary entomologist.

Continue reading

Ticks emerging earlier than normal

Typically ticks begin to appear in late spring and early summer as warm weather sets in, but this year, cases of the annual pest were reported three to four weeks earlier than normal, said agents with the University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service.

Continue reading