APHIS Removes Portions of the Townships of Batavia and Stonelick, Clermont County, Ohio, from the Asian Longhorned Beetle (Anoplophora glabripennis) Quarantine Are

Effective immediately, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) is removing five square miles from the Asian longhorned beetle (ALB) regulated area in portions of the Townships of Batavia and Stonelick, Clermont County, Ohio. APHIS determined that this area can be removed from quarantine after the program completed the final surveys of host trees within the regulated area. The regulated area in the Township of Monroe and the regulated area in the Township of Tate, along with the entirety of East Fork State Park and portions of the East Fork Wildlife Area, remain in effect. Continue reading

Eradication Program Announces 2018 Plans for Fighting the Asian Longhorned Beetle

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) is announcing 2018 Asian longhorned beetle (ALB) eradication plans. APHIS, together with the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets, the Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation, and the Ohio Department of Agriculture, is making steady progress towards the elimination of this destructive tree pest from the United States.

“We want to remind the public that program officials are going door-to-door conducting tree inspections in areas quarantined for the beetle,” said Josie Ryan, APHIS’ ALB Eradication Program national operations manager. “You can help us by allowing our program officials access to the trees on your property.” Continue reading

USDA Reminds Public: Don’t Move Wood Out of Areas Quarantined for Asian Longhorned Beetle

As colder weather approaches, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) is reminding the public not to move wood out of areas quarantined for the Asian longhorned beetle (ALB). It is important that people follow state and federal regulations, which restricts the movement of woody material, to keep this tree-killing pest from spreading outside of quarantined areas, particularly in New York, Massachusetts, and Ohio.

“Preventing the spread of the Asian longhorned beetle to places outside of quarantined areas is critical to eliminating them from these three states, and we cannot do it without the help of residents and business owners in each state,” said Josie Ryan, APHIS’ National Operations Manager for the ALB Eradication Program. “As the weather gets colder and families begin using wood stoves and fireplaces, we are reminding the public to follow the regulations, especially when stocking up on firewood.” Continue reading

Establishment of more invasive species a concern for UGA experts

By Sharon Dowdy, Clint Thompson, University of Georgia

Over the next 10 years, the number of cargo containers operating out of the Port of Savannah, Georgia, is expected to double. While additional cargo means increased revenue for the state, Chuck Bargeron, associate director of the University of Georgia Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health, is concerned it could also lead to the establishment of more invasive species.

The center has identified more than 2,900 different species of wildlife, plants and insects that are present in, but not native to, North America. Many of those species come from Asia, where the ships that deliver cargo to the Port of Savannah originate. Continue reading

Eradication Program Announces 2017 Plans for Fighting the Asian Longhorned Beetle in New York, Massachusetts, and Ohio

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), together with the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets, the Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation, and the Ohio Department of Agriculture, is announcing plans for the Asian longhorned beetle (ALB) eradication efforts taking place in 2017.  APHIS and its partners have been making steady progress towards the eradication of this destructive tree pest since its detection in New York in 1996.

“The goal is to eliminate this non-native, tree-killing pest, from the United States,” said Josie Ryan, APHIS’ national operations manager for the Asian Longhorned Beetle Eradication Program.  “We are confident that we can remove the beetle using the strategies we have available to us.” Continue reading

Invasive insects turn forests into wasteland

by Michael Casey and Patrick Whittle, Associated Press

In a towering forest of centuries-old eastern hemlocks, it’s easy to miss one of the tree’s nemeses. No larger than a speck of pepper, the Hemlock woolly adelgid spends its life on the underside of needles sucking sap, eventually killing the tree.

The bug is one in an expanding army of insects draining the life out of forests from New England to the West Coast. Aided by global trade, a warming climate and drought-weakened trees, the invaders have become one of the greatest threats to biodiversity in the United States. Continue reading

Help Worcester County Eliminate the Asian Longhorned Beetle

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) today is reminding the public of the state and federal regulations to ensure the Asian longhorned beetle (ALB) does not spread to other areas from the quarantine in Worcester County, Mass.  Regulations that restrict the movement of woody material, such as firewood, reduce the likelihood of spreading the tree-killing pest.

“Preventing the spread of the Asian longhorned beetle to areas outside of the quarantine is critical to eliminating the beetle from Massachusetts, and this cannot be done without the help of property owners and business owners in the state,” said APHIS ALB Eradication Project Manager Ryan Vazquez. “Recently, we have seen tree material move outside the regulated area, and that is why we are reminding the public to adhere to the regulations, especially when stocking up on firewood for the winter.” Continue reading